Sustainable Jersey Certification Report

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This is the Sustainable Jersey Certification Report of Madison Boro, a Sustainable Jersey silver certified applicant.

Madison Boro was certified on December 10, 2021 with 900 points. Listed below is information regarding Madison Boro’s Sustainable Jersey efforts and materials associated with the applicant’s certified actions.

Contact Information

The designated Sustainable Jersey contact for Madison Boro is:

Name:Kathleen Caccavale
Title/Position:Chair, Sustainable Madison Advisory Committee / resident volunteer
Address:Hartley Dodge Memorial Building, 50 Kings Road, Madison, NJ 07940
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone:973-966-7884

Actions Implemented

Each approved action and supporting documentation for which Madison Boro was approved for in 2021 appears below. Note: Standards for the actions below may have changed and the documentation listed may no longer satisfy requirements for that action.

  • Animals in the Community

    Companion Animal Management Pledge

    5 Points

    Program Summary: Madison passed a resolution on May 29, 2019, supporting the companion animal management pledge. The town has sections on its website devoted to pet licensing, vaccination requirements and animal control (we contract with St. Hubert's Animal Welfare Center in Madison for animal control services). The pet licensing section includes links to amendments to the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act and a guide to avoiding animal cruelty. On May 29, 2019, the Borough Council passed an ordinance that bans the sales of cats and dogs in pet stores in Madison and approved funding for fencing for a 24,000 SF dog park that is in the works. We look forward to investigating the possibility of developing a plan for consideration in the next certification cycle. A memo attaching the pledge has been distributed to the appropriate parties; see documentaton below.

    Pledge Supporting NJ Wildlife Action Plan

    10 Points

    Program Summary: On May 29, 2019, the Madison Borough Council adopted and approved Resolution R181-2019 repledging support of the state wildlife action plan per the model resolution put forth by Sustainable Jersey (first adopted in 2013 - Resolution 231-2013). [The resolution was circulated to the zoning and planning boards, to the Environmental Commission and to St. Hubert's Animal Welfare Center, with whom the Borough contracts for animal control services.] In support of this pledge, the Sustainable Madison Advisory Committee has drafted an appendix to the ERI that addresses threatened and endangered species in Madison as documented the NJDEP Landscape Project. In addition, animal control measures in town include services for non-domesticated, small wild animals, guidance for control of wild animals nesting on an owner’s property, and removal or removal assistance of wild animals that enter a home (contract with St. Hubert's Animal Welfare Center). In addition, the website states: Wild animals such as foxes, turkeys, bears and coyotes can be sighted in our community. If they are not creating a nuisance and are transient, they are considered natural to our area. If they cause damage, appear sickly or are aggressive, please review the NJDEP Division of Fish & Wildlife Website, NJDEP Division of Fish & Wildlife or call the Police Dept. The Madison Library is also hosting a presentation on June 5 called "Dealing with Wild Neighbors" presented by the Morris County Park Commission and the Borough Council is considering an ordinance granting funding for fencing a 24,000SF dog park, the proposed site for which was selected, in part, because it "doesn’t disturb nearby properties or wildlife."

  • Arts & Creative Culture

    Establish a Creative Team

    10 Points

    Program Summary: This action is marked complete for 2021 as one of the adjusted lookback period qualified actions. The Madison Arts and Culture Alliance (“MACA”) is a community-supported organization that supports and promotes the arts in Madison, NJ. The Borough Council has recognized its importance as a Creative Team by resolution and the Downtown Development Commission references it on the Borough's Rosenet website as a Community Partner. A MACA representative services as a DDC commissioner (https://www.rosenet.org/759/Meet-the-Commissioners) MACA has a website, which includes a calendar of events (http://www.madisonartsnj.org/) , and a Facebook presence (https://www.facebook.com/pg/Madison-Arts-and-Culture-Alliance-181028171908/). The update below summarizes MACA's history, purpose and major recent activities.

    Creative Assets Inventory

    10 Points

    Program Summary: In the summer and early fall of 2020, MACA (Madison Arts and Culture Alliance), which is the Borough’s recognized Creative Team (see Creative Team action) totally updated their website, which is the warehouse for the creative assets inventory. As stated on the website, The Madison Arts & Culture Alliance is a coalition of arts organizations, cultural institutions, neighbors, colleagues and friends dedicated to encouraging collaborations among the wide-ranging cultural offerings in Madison, NJ. MACA brings together artists, educators, business people, community leaders and others, all with a common goal: to support the cultural institutions and programs that improve Madison’s economy and quality of life. MACA’s Board of Directors includes professionals from the fields of music, theater, photography and the visual arts, a former mayor, a lawyer, representatives from the Madison school system and a local college, and the Executive Director of a local cultural institution – the Museum of Early Trades & Crafts, housed in a Borough-owned building that’s on the National & State Registers of Historic Places. Madison’s Director of Arts & Events, Eric Hafen, also played a major role in the updating of the inventory. MACA works in conjunction with the Downtown Development Commission, the Chamber of Commerce, venues and event sponsors to bring a robust program of arts and culture to the Madison area throughout the year. The 2020 update embraces the virtual world we are currently living in and broadens the scope of what is presented to site visitors. It includes listings for events, local artists, arts 7 cultural organizations, locales (including the Madison Community Arts Center – see – action) and culture (including the town’s history) and offers an interactive map of sites for venues, businesses and organizations around the Borough. The MACA website IS the creative assets inventory: https://www.madisonartsnj.org/

    Municipal Commitments to Support Arts and Creative Culture

    10 Points

    Program Summary: When a developer bought the former Green Village Road School property, the Borough required that their design include community space. Rose Hall has recently been completed and the Borough is leasing a 3,000-square-foot-space known as the Madison Community Arts Center, for $1/year on a 30-year lease. This provision was part of an ordinance authorizing the financial agreement with the developers. Since the opening, several events have already occurred there. A free community picnic with entertainment was held in May at the conclusion of the week-long Madison Into Yellow mental health campaign (see Building Healthier Communities). In addition, the center offers a venue for the Writer's Theatre of NJ, which had formerly been housed in the Green Village Road School building for many years. The first event at the new venue was the 2019 edition of “Soundings” -- 15 readings, with a different play presented each evening from Thursday, Jan. 3, through Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. Most of the work was created by New Jersey-based writers. In recent years, WTNJ has had to host its readings and full productions at a number of venues in the area,“It’s been difficult to keep something going without have a place of our own,” said Artistic Director John Pietrowski. The New Jersey State Council on the Arts has designated Writers Theatre of New Jersey, a 501(c)3 organization, a “Major Arts Institution” every year since 2003, and named it “an anchor institution that contributes vitally to the quality of life in New Jersey.”

    Utilizing Your Creative Assets

    30 Points

    Program Summary: Madison has had an active Downtown Development Commission (DDC) for many years; a 501(c)3 Madison Arts and Cultural Alliance (MACA) since 2006 — recognized by resolution as the Borough’s Creative Team; and a Borough Director of Arts & Events, Eric Hafen, whose responsibilities include the Madison Community Arts Center. The DDC has a standing Arts & Events Committee directed to: o Work with MACA, Madison Music and Arts (a parent-volunteer group that fundraises to support K-12 visual and performing arts), Chamber of Commerce and other community Partners on event development and support. o Advise and support the Director of Arts and Events and programming for the Madison Community Arts Center. o Research and make recommendations regarding public art installations. o Research and evaluate the viability of new events. The Director of Arts & Events and MACA are responsible for building a creative assets inventory on the MACA website (madisonartsnj.org). Together, these entities have brought a wide gamut of arts and cultural opportunities to Madison that help to make it a vibrant community and support its local businesses and artistic and cultural communities. We are reporting on just three activities in this action. Others include a sidewalk art gallery of banners submitted by local artists and displayed on downtown streetlights, themed scarecrows in 2020 sponsored by local businesses and displayed on downtown sidewalks, a socially distanced drive-in concert held in the parking lot of the Madison Recreation Complex, and a Summerfest planned for 2020 but now scheduled for 2021. In past years, the farmers’ market also featured weekly musical acts (on hiatus in 2020 due to the pandemic). We have not yet submitted the Creative Place Making Plan action but it is obvious from our report that creative place making is something that has been given much thought and action by the Creative Team, the DDC and other Borough organizations.

  • Community Partnership & Outreach

    Create Green Team

    10 Points
    Bronze Required Silver Required

    Program Summary: Many green programs previously organized or supported by the Sustainable Madison Advisory Committee continue or resume in 2020. These programs include Shred-It Days, May Day, the Direct Energy Install Program, Sustainable Lawns and used Shoe collection. For additional information about Sustainable Madison, including current membership, and recent agendas and minutes, visit http://www.rosenet.org/447/Sustainable-Madison-Committee. Due to CoViD19, the 2019 annual report from Madison's green team (SMAC) has not yet been presented to Madison Borough Council. However a draft of the presentation is attached. Looking forward, the Committee will discuss long-term plans and projects, potential grant opportunities, engaging the college communities (which we are doing with some success already) and investigating the requirements for Gold Star recognition.

    Community Education and Outreach

    15 Points

    Program Summary: Madison Borough is fortunate to have a team of volunteers involved in a high level of community education and outreach on many topics tied to sustainability. Our reports document several recent and outstanding examples of this work, including: the development and distribution of the Madison Environmental Commission newsletter, education and engagement on climate action and sustainable affordable housing, and a new partnerships with the publishers of our local print (and online) newspaper, the Madison Eagle to produce the "North Jersey Green" column. Taken together, the activities sustained by volunteers over the past year demonstrate the success of education and outreach in reaching individuals and influencing local decision-making.

    Hold a Green Fair

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Since no Green Fair was held in 2020, we are invoking the adjusted lookback period for this action. On April 27, 2019, Madison held its fourth consecutive annual Green Fair held at the Madison Public Library. Madison's 2019 Green Fair had 3 main themes: buy local, green your garden, and reduce your plastic use. The fair consisted of local and county organizations exhibiting at tables outdoors, arrayed around the courtyard of Madison Public Library. Project Aware, the student run environmental awareness, education and action club at Madison High School, supported the Environmental Commission’s kick-off of ‘Plastic Free Week’ with a display of alternatives to single use plastic. Their booth highlighted Skip the Straw, which was an activism focus that came out of the Green Vision Forum. They partnered with fifth grader Amelia Nevin to canvas 52 Madison restaurants and assess their willingness to participate in a voluntary Skip the Straw campaign. The Green Fair raised awareness regarding their efforts. Karen Bussolini, Master Gardener, was featured speaker for the day: "Planting a Year-Round Pollinator Friendly Garden". She is also an author, journalist, photographer, NOFA-Accredited Organic Land Care Professional and eco-friendly garden coach.

  • Diversity & Equity

    Environmental Justice in Planning & Zoning

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Sustainable Madison volunteers collaborated with Borough council woman Astri Baillie and mayor Rob Conley to develop and promote an educational program on Environmental Justice, with the goal of initiating an ongoing dialogue about diversity and equity in planning. Mayor Conley requested that Susan Blickstein, a professional planner, and her associates, develop a presentation with and training materials for the Planning Board, which were presented to the planning board and discussed on July 22. The timing of this EJ training has been important and influential as part of the Master Plan revision process. Additional environmental justice training is planned for this winter.

  • Emergency Management & Resiliency

    Extreme Temperature Event Plan

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Madison’s Extreme Temperature Plan has four objectives: 1. Curtailment of Peak Electrical Demand during periods of high temperature, 2. Providing advice to citizens for coping with high temperatures, 3. Notifying citizens about Warming Stations during periods of low temperatures, 4. Notifying citizens about Cooling Stations during periods of high temperatures. The plan and a resolution by the town council endorsing it are submitted as supporting documents. Three exerpts from Madison’s RoseNet website are also submitted: (1) Cooling Centers and Tips for the Heat – Plan and Poster, (2) Peak Curtailment Program & Poster and (3) Warming Centers – Plan and Poster. The plan is managed by the Coordinator of Emergency Management, a member of Madison’s Police Force. He/she is also the individual who declares when to implement the plan. A meeting of the current Coordinator, John Rafter, a representative of the Madison Health Department, Marlene Dolan, and Peter Fried of the Sustainable Madison Committee was held on Aug. 15, 2019 to review the plan, discuss recent use of it and any necessary changes. No changes were identified at that time. An attendance list is in the supporting documents. For the last two years notices have been sent to citizens when alerts of extreme high or low temperature are received from the Morris County Office of Emergency Management. Before then, Madison depended on alerts from NOAA to trigger its alerting of citizens. Notifications are sent to citizens via Facebook, Twitter and the NotifyMe system. The Rosenet website provides links for resident to sign up for alert notifications. Notifications for the cooling centers and for curtailment of peak electrical demand are sent out simultaneously and were issued roughly 15 times last summer (2018). Warming Station notifications were sent out 2-3 times this last winter (2018-2019).

    Heat Island Assessment

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Urban heat islands are created when materials in built environments such as asphalt, concrete, and roofing, elevate the temperatures in particular areas. On hot summer days, these “hot spots” in our town can be more harmful for people, who need to work, recreate or travel outdoors. They can also elevate costs of electricity where additional cooling is required to keep indoor temperatures comfortable. While it is true that there are benefits to these warmer areas in winter, with trending upward temperatures, and longer durations of heat waves, the negative effects of peak high temperatures in hot spots, particularly for employees, elderly and children, make simple interventions in our built environment worth considering. Additionally, the unique situation of our Borough’s ownership of our electric utility puts us in a position to benefit as a community to reduce peak summer loads. The price of our electricity is calculated based on the usage during peak summer days. Conservation during these days will reduce prices overall for the borough and all residents. The "Urban Heat Island Assessment" provides evidence of Madison Borough’s efforts to conduct a heat island assessment, and develop list of recommendations to mitigate heat islands and their impacts on vulnerable populations. We also demonstrate the involvement of relevant stakeholders in the development of our plan. The assessment found three significant heat islands in the borough: a shopping center parking lot, a green roof for a private parking lot, and the high school. Site specific recommendations are made for each location, which can help reduce energy costs and health costs associated with excess heat. The most important component of this document is setting up a plan to begin education and outreach on issues surrounding urban heat islands. In August, the Assistant Borough Administrator shared this document with governing body and the Borough Clerk shared his email with the Environmental Commission and the Green Team (Sustainable Madison Advisory Committee), which had already approved and commended it.

    Emergency Communications Planning

    15 Points

    Program Summary: We are invoking the Adjusted Lookback Period for this action since the documentation is from 2019. Previous narrative: See UPDATED checklist, plus sign-in sheet for LEPC training. In addition: At Bottle Hill Day, a yearly street festival that draws in thousands of people, Madison Police Department prepares and distributes children ID’s which allow us to obtain photos of the children in the event they go missing. At Bottle Hill Day the Madison PBA tent hands out important information to all those in attendance about emergency communications. At this year's event on October 5, they handed out information about AlertMadison, a new system that replaced Nixle (as of November 4) and can be used for personal/family medical emergencies (SMART 9-1-1) as well as weather-related events. Information about AlertMadison and access to online registration at www.alertmadison.org. is available on the Borough website. See documentation below.

    Vulnerable Populations Identification for Emergencies

    10 Points

    Program Summary: After Hurricane Sandy, our emergency responders along with OEM personnel met and shared experiences and lessons learned. We created a form to send out to our residents through our electric billing system. The form was designed to capture residents who require assistance during periods of prolonged power outages and/or local emergencies. (Attachment 1) The goal is to identify this population and to try and get them to be more self sufficient and not need to rely on local emergency services. (Attachment 2) The notice has gone out in our utility billing mailings, which are mailed to every household in the Borough, and is scheduled to go out again in 2019. It can also be filled out via an online form accessible by clicking on the Rosenet home page slider (attachment 3) Responses received will be entered into an excel database secured to just a few emergency personnel for reference during another weather crisis or local emergency. We did send out those forms in 2019 and updated our database accordingly…Since then, we have launched an online process to register for electric and water service as folks move into town…On that form is a yes/no question that asks if the address requires lifesaving equipment. Additionally, as our utility office receives requests for final billing due to a death, that info is passed along and our database is updated…We are planning to send out another town wide mailing like we did in 2019 in 2022…

  • Energy

    Energy Efficiency for Municipal Facilities

    20 Points
    Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary: Madison submits this action, Municipal Energy Efficiency, for 20 points based on: (1) a window upgrade to the Dept. of Public Works Garage, one building in our ESPM portfolio, that will save > 10% of its energy costs. From the data entered into ESPM, the 2018 gas consumption for that building is 14614 therms. The building has large old windows (see photos). The upgrade, authorized by Borough resolution R 240-2018 replaces all the old single-pane windows (U=1.1) with new thermally efficient windows (United 4800 windows, Low Emissivity coated glass, filled with Argon, U=0.26). 15 windows are being replaced of which 4 are presently completed. Supporting documents include: • the authorizing resolution, with photos and the contractor’s specifications, • a spreadsheet detailing the thermal savings of 2117 therms annually, 14.5% of the 2018 gas budget, and • the EUI_Calculator_for_Energy_Efficiency_for_Municipal_Buildings, (see the third tab) showing savings of 14.5% of the buildings annual gas budget and 10.6% of the total energy (elec. & gas) budget. (2) an LGEA audit of our municipal building portfolio. Our application to LGEA was approved and audits were completed in November 2019. Supporting documents: • LGEA approval letter, • Energy Star SEP certificates for all 5 buildings. Per discussion in 2019, we are now (June 2020) submitting (as a supporting document) the complete audit reports to extend the approval for this action. (Please note; we have loaded data for 18 buildings into ESPM, the ET&M system. Most of these are minor buildings and our official portfolio of larger buildings is just the 5 being audited.)

    Energy Tracking and Management

    20 Points
    Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary: Madison is applying for both the mandatory and the optional points. The two items pointed out in the June 2021 submission have been corrected and updated SEP reports are included here. Mandatory 10 points. This spring (2021), we obtained monthly consumption for 2020 for all 56 municipal electric and 19 gas meters,(as we did the previous year). The buildings use no other fuels and were broken down into five categories: • 5 Key buildings that became the LGEA “building portfolio” • 6 Other buildings and storage sheds • 7 Water supply facilities (5 Wells, 2 water towers) • 7 Wastewater pumping stations • 29 Street, Traffic and Athletic Lights and concession stands The spreadsheet supplied has 5 worksheets: (1) an explanation of the categories and how they are accounted for in the ET&M system and in the carbon footprint, (2) the building inventory, (3) 2018-19 monthly electric consumption, (4) 2018-2020 monthly gas consumption and (5) 2020 monthly electric consumption. We have loaded the 18 buildings of the first 3 categories into ESPM. Per discussion with SNJ and NJCEP, we define our “portfolio” as 5 key buildings, which we will use for Gold Star tracking (along with our fleet inventory). Optional 10 points. We are making regular ET&M updates. Internal software developed last year is used to translate data from the Madison Electric Utility into the ESPM upload format. Entries of 2020 data are complete. The process document has been updated with recent improvements and is supplied with this submission. We also supply: (a) one document with 5 ESPM summary graphs for 2018 thru 2020 for our 5 “portfolio buildings and (b) another document with the 2020 ESPM SEP reports for the 5 buildings. Key activities for 2021 are: 1. As necessary we are making this process compatible with the emerging requirements for Gold Star tracking.

    Buy Electricity From A Renewable Source

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Madison Borough operates its own electric utility and purchases electricity in advance on the spot market. From 2016 to 2019, electricity generated from renewable sources accounted for over a quarter of electric purchases. Using the Madison Energy Tracking documentation, this report finds that between 2018 and 2019, 30 percent of electricity purchased for municipal buildings and operations came from renewable sources. This value exceeds Class I RPS Percentage Requirements by 17 percent. Borough administrator Jim Burnet affirms the proportion of town electricity purchased from renewable sources.

    Commercial Energy Efficiency Outreach

    20 Points

    Program Summary: This action had been delayed while Borough staff considered the issue that the action appears to be exempt from the State Bid Laws for competitive bids. That issue has been resolved. Donnelly Energy, the participating contractor for our town, sent out a letter on October 21, 2019. The Letter campaign went to 255 businesses in Madison in net (discounting about 45 returned mail pieces), in the 2500 sq ft to 40,000k sq ft range – the typical size of buildings that qualify for Direct Install based off of energy usage. The original mailing was followed up by in-person Donnelly Energy outreach totaling 148 impressions/businesses as of 11/21/19. A Donnelly representative spoke with 35 decision makers, the rest were either employees or not the appropriate contact. Brochure/letter/flyer was left behind for all. 4 decision makers were not interested in the program but kept information. 57 additional personal emails were sent to business owners who Donnelly did not personally meet with but obtained contact information from an employee, as a second touch point. Donnelly held a breakfast on December 17, 2019, in conjunction with the Madison Chamber of Commerce, which resulted in 4-5 of the assessments. In addition, a home page slider was placed on the Borough's Rosenet website with a link to the Donnelly Direct Install web page at https://www.donnellyenergy.com/services/direct-install/ As of August 2020, Donnelley had received 10 requests for Direct Install Assessments, which exceeds Madison's 2.5% threshhold of 6. Therefore, although this action had been approved in 2019 for 10 points, we are resubmitting in 2020 for 20. In response to reviewer comments, a clarified spreadsheet has been uploaded. As of November 13, Donnelley reports that all 10 listings on the spreadsheet were completed Direct Install assessments, where Donnelly conducted the audit and sat down with the customer to review the audit finding and gave them proposals. Two of those assessments have turned into projects – where they moved forward with a Direct Install upgrade. (Madison Pharmacy is done with their upgrade and the YMCA is still being worked on.)

    Residential Energy Efficiency Outreach

    20 Points

    Program Summary: Home Performance with Energy Star – In the fall of 2018, and previously in December 2016, Ciel Power won the bid to provide home energy audits to Madison residents. Through the spring of 2019, more than 200 households have participated and at least 40 have contracted with Ciel Power to perform upgrades. It is unknown how many may have followed up with DIY projects or other contractors. The audit is offered at $49 and is publicized on the Rosenet website with a graphic on the home page slider that links to a page that describes the program, including a video testimonial from Carmela Vitale, a Borough Council member, about her audit experience, two videos from Ciel Power, and a link to a Ciel Power page dedicated to the Madison program. We have been informed that Comfort Partners outreach is no longer a requisite for this action.

    Fleet Inventory

    10 Points
    Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary: The Fleet Inventory Action is one of 5 actions that form Madison's integrated plan of energy and emission measurement plan (supporting document). The 2020 Inventory has been competed and is organized like the 2019 inventory: 1. Inventory Spreadsheet. Robert Duffy of the Madison Dept. of Public Works has supplied 2020 and 2019 odometer and fueling data for all the Borough’s vehicles (approx.. 95) and the data have been entered on the spreadsheet. Proper adjustments were made for vehicles added to or removed from the fleet. 2. Process Improvements. Recommendations from the 2019 process document have been used to improve the 2020 inventory process. The 2019 document has been updated for 2020 (supporting docs). We are discussing several further recommendations for improvement with the vendor of the fueling system software. 3. Analysis and Planning. A Fleet Inventory report has been written (see supporting docs) analyzing the fleet, its efficiency and its carbon footprint. The report presents mileage and fuel consumption metrics for each vehicle and each department. Fleet GHG emissions in 2020 were 532 metric tons of CO2, down 7.7% from 2019. The report includes: mpg efficiency data, driver training and maintenance procedures and sections on key 2020 achievements and 2021 objectives. Three hybrid vehicles (incl. 2 police cars) entered service in 2020, two more are on order and continued greening of the police fleet is recommended. 4. Reporting. The inventory spreadsheet, process document and analysis report are included with this SJ submission. Unnecessary columns have been removed from the inventory spreadsheet as all vehicles are owned by the borough and all are in use by the department that they are assigned to. 5. Updating. The inventory, analysis and plans will be updated annually and used for vehicle fleet decision-making.

    Purchase Alternative Fuel Vehicles

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Borough of Madison purchased its first two new hybrid Ford Interceptor SUV police cars in 2019 (delivered in 2020). From data on these two vehicles in the 2020 Fleet Inventory we have determined that these hybrids are each saving 800-900 gallons of fuel per year. This fuel savings will pay for the price premium of the vehicles in 2.5 years. In 2020 Madison purchased two additional Hybrid Interceptors (delivered spring 2021). We attach supporting documents including two purchase orders and the Borough Council Resolution authorizing the 2020 purchase. This purchase (vehicles are in service this year) should qualify Madison for 10 points on this action. As requested in comments to our June 2021 submission, registrations for the new Hybrid Interceptors are also enclosed as a supporting document. Madison has for 3 years been using an electric bicycle for police functions, including emergency response. This bicycle was purchased by the Downtown Development Commission (DDC) and donated to the Police Department (see supporting news release, photo and requisition). The bicycle allows police officers the mobility they would ordinarily require a police car for. As a fifth alternate fuel vehicle in our municipal fleet of 99 vehicles, Madison should also qualify at the 15-point level for this action. We have added the two new hybrids and this E-bicycle to the 2020 fleet inventory (attached), To acquire an EV shuttle bus for the Madison Senior Center, the Borough submitted a grant application to NJ Transit under the Federal Transportation Authority 5310 Program. Madison is also considering the purchase of an EV parking patrol vehicle in the next year or two. Additionally, we will investigate the Ford electric F-150 Lightning as a candidate for two pick-ups in the capitol plan for 2021 – 2022.

    Public Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure

    15 Points

    Program Summary: Subj: Public Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure; October 2020 submission to Sustainable Jersey In February of 2019 Madison submitted a grant application to the NJ DEP “It Pays to Plug-In” program for funds to purchase 5 dual port charging stations for public use. The grant was awarded in August and accepted in September, 2019. Madison is currently preparing a second grant application for additional stations. Below we describe progress on the first set of stations. An official letter, submitted as a supporting document, documents key features and provides photos as well. 1. Charging Stations. (10 charging cables on 5 dual-port stations) With funds from the September 2019 grant, Madison has purchased 5 SemaConnect Series 6 Dual Port, Level II, 7.2 kW, 30 Amp (max) charging stations. Two of those stations are installed and on-line. The other three are being installed and will be operational by Thanksgiving of this year. 2. Directory Information. The two operational stations are identified on both the SemaConnect App and on the PlugShare network. The remaining stations will also be visible on those networks when they are on-line. 3. Signage. Figures 4 and 5 of the supporting document shows the parking-space-marking and signage that will be used at the stations in Madison. 4. Financial Approach. The cost of the stations was borne by the Borough and will be submitted for reimbursement under the grant. The stations are owned by the Borough. Installation is paid for by the Borough and carried out by the Borough Department of Public Works and the Borough Electric Utility. All costs for the electricity and operation of the stations will be paid by the revenue from users. The rates are $1.00/hr for the first two hours, $3.00/hr for hours three and four and $25/hr after that.

    Make Your Town Electric Vehicle Friendly

    15 Points

    Program Summary: Several years ago Madison began preparing for a growing population of electric vehicles. Several recent tasks for this action are described here: 1. EVSE Ordinance. On 8 November 2021 the Madison Borough Council approved Ordinance 42-2021, which duplicates the recently adopted state EVSE ordinance except for two minor changes to sections where the state ordinance allows modification (in Sections F-2 and F-6). As required by the state ordinance, the Madison ordinance establishes EVSE as a permitted accessory use. The ordinance is submitted as a supporting document. 2. First-Responder Training for EV-involved incidents. On September 28, 2021, Madison first responders attended a training program at the Morris County Fire Academy. The program included two hours of lectures by David Bouvia of Wreckmasters, followed by hand-on training on several vehicles including Teslas brought by the Delaware Valley Tesla Club. A submitted document includes a course description, photos and sign-in sheets. 3. Awareness Event: On April 22, 2021, the Environmental Commissions of Madison, Chatham Borough and Chatham Township sponsored an EV Expo at the Sunday Motor Café in Madison. The 3-hour event was a great success with over 100 attendees. A supporting document includes a complete description, a link to hi-res photos, a press release and an excellent drone video. 4. Public Charging Stations. For the last year Madison has operated 5 dual-cable Level-II charging stations in municipal parking lots. These were acquired under an NJDEP “It Pay$ to Plug In” grant. This year 5 more dual-cable stations were purchased under a second grant and will be installed soon. A submitted document provides a map of the locations. 5. Using NJDEP data, every year Madison tracks its EV population against local target numbers that support the state goal of 330,000 in 2025 to determine whether additional EV-encouraging measures are needed.

  • Food

    Community Gardens

    20 Points

    Program Summary: Madison launched its community garden in 2011-2012. It is located at the Madison Recreation Complex, a municipal park off Ridgedale Avenue. Currently there are eighty four 10’ by 20’ plots, some of which are divided into half plots. In addition to the citizen gardens, there are 3 hoop houses and two Rutgers Master Gardener plots. These structures provide community educational opportunities and produce food throughout the year that is donated to local food pantries. The Madison municipal government has been very supportive of the community garden. It has appointed a Madison Community Garden Advisory Committee with a liaison from the township council that attends the monthly meetings. The borough provided funds to cover many of the garden’s start up costs such as fencing. Some of this money remains in an escrow account and is supplemented by modest annual participant fees. The Department of Public Works regularly delivers mulch to the garden. Also, the borough has allowed the garden to tap into the public water line. Projects for 2019 include a new composting system, installation of a French drain along the southern garden fence, and a potato demonstration plot. This action has been updated for 2020 by including the 2020 application, food bank donation documentation, and the completed required questionnaire.

    Buy Fresh Buy Local Programs

    10 Points

    Program Summary: We are invoking the adjusted lookback period for this action since the documentation is from 2019. Previous narrative: Madison Borough and its vendors support and promote fresh and local products, and associated marketing, in a variety of ways. The Madison Farmers' Market incorporates the State's Jersey Fresh logo and branding into its PR, signage, and outreach materials, some of which are posted on the borough’s Rosenet web site. Individual vendors at the market use Jersey Fresh branding materials to identify their locally grown and harvested products. The market itself sells fresh and local produce to consumers and restaurants. Several specialty shops and restaurants in Madison, including Healthy Italia on Main Street (one of the 2019 Farmers’ Market sponsors), take advantage of their proximity to the weekly market to purchase ingredients for their menus, meals and cooking classes. Others like Harvest Bistro, Madison Bagel Cafe, and Central + Main source locally. Madison's two supermarkets promote the State's Jersey Fresh branding in their produce and flower/plant aisles. Stop and Shop, for instance, places New Jersey grown produce such as peppers, blueberries, and asparagus at the front of its store. Whole Foods specially signs fruits, vegetables, and flowers grown on nearby farms such as Holland Greenhouses in Monroe and Upper Freehold, NJ. In addition, Gary's Wine and Marketplace lists 47 local New Jersey beers available for sale on a special section of its website. Another option for area residents looking for fresh, NJ-grown produce is a Community Supported Agriculture program. Flatbrook Farm of Sandyston is one that offers a weekly Madison pick up at a private residence and has several membership choices. Purple Dragon is another, offering every other week deliveries. Several of these businesses are featured in the I Love Madison Marketplace. Also, businesses are invited to table at the farmers market once during the season (see Madison Eagle article below) The sponsor logos in the second and third documents below are on the signage for the farmers market (yard signs, light pole signs) and on Rosenet and social media. We have posted the list in document 1 on our sustainablemadisonnj.org website (see documentation).

    Farmers Markets

    10 Points

    Program Summary: For 2021, Madison extended its season to May 20-November 18 and shifted its hours earlier - 1-6 pm - to allow for lunchtime shoppers. The market averages 25-30 vendors every week. We have multiple NJ farms, specialty food vendors, local crafters and artisans participating. Vendor spaces range from $700-1,000/season depending on size of space to $40/week. This weekly rate allows a new vendor to try the market out before committing to a full season and allows part-time crafters to participate as often as meets their individual schedules. Operational costs typically range between $2-5,000.00 not including staffing costs. Gross annual income ranges from $15-20,000.00. A weekly email lists the vendors that will be present that week. Moving to Dodge Field in 2020 (two blocks from the main street) offers better parking, is safer for shoppers, with no logistical impact to local downtown businesses. Town businesses and organizations have the opportunity to table on a rotating basis. We hope to bring back live entertainment later in the season. Commuters who are at the train station just a couple of block away can come down to the market after they get off the train. Two schools are within two blocks of Dodge Field, and many parents head to the market after picking up their children. The Eagle and Tap Into news outlets publish information from our social media posts. We have an ad in Edible Jersey and lawn signs around town and a weekly e-newsletter on Constant Contact. The Borough website page (https://www.rosenet.org/380/Madison-Farmers-Market), this year's vendor contracts, Borough resolution, recent social media posts and other outreach are included in the documentation. Madison’s Downtown Development Commission (DDC) first created and organized the Madison Farmers’ Market. The DDC is a mayoral appointed commission consisting of approximately twenty residents, business owners, and municipal officials.

    Making Farmers Markets Accessible

    5 Points

    Program Summary: The Downtown Development Commission (DDC), which includes municipal public officials in its membership, continues to make accessibility a priority in planning the Madison Farmers’ Market. The 2019 Madison Farmers' Market will be held in the heart of the borough's downtown, on Central Avenue between Main Street and Cook Avenue. This section of the street will be closed to automobile traffic during shopping hours. The location is easy to reach by pedestrians and bicyclists from most neighborhoods in town and is close to two schools. The Madison Train Station (0.1 mi) and a NJ Transit bus stop (corner of Central and Main Street) are located nearby. Public parking is available on Central Avenue, Waverly Place, Cook Avenue, Main Street and several public lots including those on Cook Avenue and Elmer Place. In addition, para transit has been provided in recent years to interested senior citizen shoppers via the Madison Senior Center van, a municipally supported endeavor. The Madison Farmers’ Market staff is always available to help shoppers carry produce to their cars. Also, the Madison Farmers' Market is economically accessible. Melick's Town Farm and Vacchiano Farm accept WIC and senior vouchers and Alstede Farms accepts EBT (food stamps, SNAP), WIC and senior WIC. Both full-season and weekly (limit 10 appearances) vendors are asked when they apply whether they accept food stamps and/or WIC coupons. This action has been updated to include the recommended addition of information regarding vendors who accept WIC, etc., to the website (https://www.rosenet.org/380/Madison-Farmers-Market) and to a weekly email about the garden.

  • Green Design

    Create a Green Development Checklist

    10 Points

    Program Summary: In response to reviewer comments, a document has been added listing dates of meetings where the new checklist has been used as part of the application process. In 2020 and early 2021, the Madison EC has reviewed and commented on several commercial site plans. The EC's comments make recommendations to incorporate green building elements, citing Madison's newly updated Land Use Element of the Master Plan, as well as the State Energy Plan, to bolster the recommendations. Sustainable Madison and EC chairs also had conversations about how the Preliminary Environmental Checklist then required to be filled out by developers submitting applications needed to be reviewed and updated in light of the push for climate change-mitigating elements to be incorporated in building and site design. The town planner supported this initiative and met with the EC chair and a representative from the Shade Tree Board. Elements from the Green Development Checklist and other model checklists were suggested. A draft was created, reviewed and commented on by Planning Board members, the EC, Sustainable Madison and Shade Tree. A final updated "greener" checklist, adopted by ordinance on July 12, 2021, has now replaced the previous Environmental Checklist. A signed copy of the ordinance, which includes the checklist, is submitted as documentation. The ordinance adopts the checklist as a change to the Land Use chapter (195) of the Borough Code, stating: Whereas the 2020 Master Plan recognizes its commitment to energy efficiency, sustainability, and resiliency as one of its guiding principles. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Council of the Borough of Madison … that Chapter 195 of the Land Development Ordinance of the Borough of Madison, is hereby amended as follows: I. Amend Chapter 195 to add a new provision, 195-23B(22), to read as follows: A preliminary environmental checklist shall be completed for all site plan applications and for all subdivision applications that involve new construction.

    Green Building Education

    5 Points

    Program Summary: As the Madison Environmental Commission 2019 Annual Report describes, Our first Eco House Garden Tour took place on Sept 21. More than 160 people booked tickets. The tour featured four houses with cutting edge energy features, (including two passive design houses), native plants, organic vegetables, solar energy, home energy audits, chickens, bees and more. The Senior Center donated its bus for transportation to Loantaka Way, where parking was tricky. Volunteers helped staff the house. The event was wildly successful—40 solar consults, 20-plus signups for energy audits. People were sent home with free seeds, eggs, and lots of inspiration from their passionately committed eco neighbors. Prior to the event, the planners, principally Claire Whitcomb and Joan Maccari, identified volunteers to participate in sharing their homes, yards, and gardens with community members. Once a participant list and date were identified, the organizers collaborated with Borough communications to approve a press release (attached as .pdf), and signup links using Signup Genius to encourage area participants to RSVP and alert community members to the event. The information was shared widely on the town’s website, Rosenet, Facebook page, and the town newspapers. A beautiful flyer was crafted by a volunteer and posted around town and shared through social media (attached below). A sign-in booth at Claire Whitcomb’s house provided maps and flyers describing the different stops along the tour, and a booth for energy audits was also available for people to visit and signup for audits.

    Upgrade/Retrofit-Light Pollution

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Madison Borough has established policies governing all outdoor lighting for the town, and municipal buildings are in compliance with these rules. In Part II: General Legislation/Land Development, Article IV Development Requirements and Standards, the code exterior lighting, § 195-25.6 C.d.2. requires lighting fixtures be installed and maintained to prevent light trespass, while a § 195-25.6 C.d.2. codifies energy efficiency and fixture design as policy. The borough policy is also to replace with LEDs when older, non-LED fixtures no longer function. In public meetings with minutes, it has been observed that the town is replacing its streetlights with LEDs, doing several each year. Receipts for purchases are uploaded as a separate PDF for this action, as are Environmental Commission meeting minutes describing town commitments to ongoing upgrades of LEDs. LEDs are now best practices because of cost and conservation of energy.

  • Health & Wellness

    Anti-Idling Education & Enforcement Program

    10 Points

    Program Summary: We are invoking the adjusted lookback period for this action since the documentation is from 2019. Previous narrative: Madison's anti-idling program was initiated in 2010 by a Madison Eagle Scout, coordinating with municipal police department, environmental commission, local scout troups and DPW. Several anti-idling signs were placed at each location: three public and one private elementary school, the junior school, the Train Station and the YMCA. Signs are still in place at all locations, though some are partly faded and should be replaced. We are looking into the best way to accomplish that. Driver compliance is not as good as we would like. We are communicating with the schools, train station and YMCA to plan educational outreach. It is still unclear if any of the venues will welcome our presentations or handouts. A survey to determine public attitudes may be a good first step. A positive note is that the Borough Council restated its support by adopting an anti-idling resolution on May 29, 2019. The 'Be Idle-Free' poster is available for download on Rosenet, the Madison Borough website. http://www.rosenet.org/DocumentCenter/View/6528/Idle-Free-Poster_824_Final?

    Building Healthier Communities

    20 Points

    Program Summary: This action is marked completed as one of the qualifying actions with an adjusted lookback period. All documentation is from 2019. The mayor has signed the pledge again in 2021. Madison has been participating in the Mayor's Wellness Campaign since 2007. Our mayor, who is also Vice President-Operations at the Madison Area YMCA, has signed the annual participation pledge for 2019. The MWC has an active committee, which includes a representative from the Borough Council and whose most recent big project was the third annual week-long Madison Into Yellow campaign this May (see community wide). MWC’s outreach includes a Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/mayorswellnessmadisonnj/) and a section on the Borough’s website (https://www.rosenet.org/308/Mayors-Wellness-Campaign) Between the MWC, the Health Department, Senior Services and several organizations devoted to healthy communities, we are applying for points for community wide, youth and senior initiatives.

    Health in All Policies Professional Development

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Summary: Three members of Sustainable Madison, including councilwoman Maureen Byrne participated in NAACHO Health in All Policies training during the spring and summer of 2020. Notes from the training events were recorded and shared with Sustainable Madison and Madison Board of Health. Participants included Lisa Jordan and Marilyn Musielski, members of Sustainable Madison, and council woman Maureen Byrne, Council liaison to Sustainable Madison. Due to the COVID-19 disruptions in municipal activities, the meeting minutes for the August 25 presentation are not available.

    Safe Routes to School

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The uploaded documents were submitted by TransOptions for Safe Routes to Schools silver certification. TransOptions has advised that Madison is on the list of towns that have earned a certificate as a Recognition Program Winner at the silver level. As of 8/14, we are still awaiting the certificate. Thanks to TransOptions for their ongoing help with this initiative. The link to the certification listings is: http://www.saferoutesnj.org/2020-nj-srts-recognition-program-winners/ Madison earned silver at the municipal level and Torey J. Sabatini School earned silver as an individual school. A pdf of the listing is attached (Madison is on page 5).

    Smoke-Free and Tobacco-Free Public Places

    10 Points

    Program Summary: In November 2013, the mayor of Madison signed Ordinance 46-2013 to prohibit smoking in public parks and recreational areas. The ordinance was reported on by the Madison Eagle and Madison Patch and a video of its passage remains on the Patch web site. Signage in support of the ordinance has been installed in Madison parks. Karen Blumenfeld, executive director of Global Advisors for Smokefree Policy (GASP), a tobacco control non-profit located in Summit, New Jersey, was instrumental in providing information and support for the ordinance. Links to the ordinance and media coverage, as well as photos of posted signs and an indication of their locations are included in the overview document uploaded below.

  • Innovative Projects

    Innovative Community Project 1

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Madison-Chatham Joint Sewage Treatment Plant, managed by Mr. Chris Manak, carries out wastewater treatment for both Madison and Chatham, and also processes the residual solid-waste material. These solids are placed in a 'digester' tank that uses microorganisms to digest the solid material in a process known as anaerobic digestion. This reduces the hazardous content in the final output of the facility. The facility has undergone several upgrades over recent years to institute three innovative features: 1. The use of anaerobic digestion to further process solid residual waste, instead of shipping that waste to other processing or dumping. 2. The re-capture of the methane generated by the anaerobic digestion, rather than releasing the methane to the atmosphere, and 3. The re-use of the methane to supplement the purchased natural gas in multi-fuel diesel engines used to heat the waste and accelerate the digestion. This eliminates the release of the methane and reduces the required natural gas purchases. A summary set of charts about anaerobic digestion is supplied as a supporting document. In 2018 9,336,852 cf of methane was re-captured and used for fuel. This is equivalent to 96,823 therms of natural gas. In 2018, the facility also purchased, 6,062 Million BTUs of natural gas, equivalent to 60,062 therms. Thus the recaptured methane provided about 62% of the gas fuel for the facility in 2018 and, at average rates, saved the facility ~$ 30,000. Recapture of the methane is essential because the amount is equivalent to about 175 metric tonnes, which if released (and not flared) would be equivalent to 4375 tonnes of CO2.. An article on the national implications of this is also submitted. These numbers will be included in the calculations necessary for other Actions, including the Carbon Footprints and the Energy Tracking and Energy Efficiency Calculations.

    Innovative Community Project 2

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The much-needed social distancing measures prompted by COVID-19 changed the trajectory for many green teams around New Jersey, while also upending opportunities and plans for many young people in the summer of 2020. In trying to make the best of a difficult situation, Madison green team volunteers worked together to organize, advertise, and implement a virtual internship program. The effect of this program was to extend the volunteer base of environmental groups, and create systems of mentorship for many people new to volunteer work. Some volunteers continued past the summer and some are returning again in the summer of 2021. In 2021, Madison was asked to participate in the Sustainable Champions Showcase at the Sustainability Summit, as the 2020 champion tor a mid-size community. We chose to present on the Virtual Internship initiative, hoping it would inspire other towns. A pdf of the presentation is included in the documentation.

    Innovative Community Project 3

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Innovative Action #3. Wildflower Pollinator Meadow. Since 2017 Madison has been restoring a large native wildflower pollinator meadow in the Madison Recreation Complex. The program is fully funded and will be complete in 2021. Accompanying this is an educational program comprising a series of pollinator workshops and walks for residents. Quoting from the grant applications for the meadow restoration: “The project will benefit the community by encouraging sustained efforts to protect and enhance our native environment. It will provide much needed forage and habitat for native pollinators and birds in our suburban landscape. With native pollinator (bees, wasps, butterflies, moths, hummingbirds) and honey bee populations under great stress, creating habitat to attract and nourish these beneficial species with help enhance the vitality of the entire community.” The meadow restoration is being done in three phases: • Phase 1: initial ¼ acre completed in the spring of 2017. • Phase 2: second ¼+ acre prepped and seeded in the fall of 2018. • Phase 3: balance of the 14 acres, funded (6/2019) and to be completed in 2021. Supporting documents include the three grant applications that provide a wealth of details and a file with the site plans. In addition, the Madison Environmental Commission is sponsoring a series of 5 workshops this year (Feb. 23, June 22, Aug. 24, Oct 19 and Nov. 9 jointly with Madison Library) that are aimed at educating and encouraging residents to plant pollinators. These include instructional workshops and tours of native plantings in Madison. A supporting document shows the announcement publicity circulated by the Library, details about the events and pictures from the first one.

  • Land Use & Transportation

    Sustainable Land Use Pledge

    10 Points
    Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary: On June 28, 2010, Madison's Borough Council unanimously approved Resolution 175-2010 supporting the Sustainable Land Use Pledge. On May 9, 2016, the Borough Council approved Resolution 155-2016, expressing continued support for sustainable land use. Again, on May 11, 2020, the Council continued their support by adopting R 138-2020. The Borough Clerk distributed a copy of the resolution via email to appropriate parties. See documentation below.

    Bicycle and Pedestrian Audits

    10 Points

    Program Summary: In 2019, the Borough of Madison Green team successfully submitted a bicycle audit to Sustainable Jersey (5 points). For 2020, we have expanded our study to include both pedestrian and bicycle components. A complete map of sidewalk locations in the Borough was digitized. The Borough of Madison collaborated with TransOptions, our Transportation Management Association (TMA), to conduct a pedestrian safety education and outreach campaign in fall of 2019. The results of the Street Smart Madison Campaign are summarized and attached as supporting documentation. Our combined pedestrian and bicycle audit, the recent activities of the town’s Complete Streets committee and our Safe Routes to Schools initiatives demonstrate Madison’s commitment to improving pedestrian safety and access to alternative transportation.

    Green Infrastructure Planning

    5 Points

    Program Summary: This report examines the extent of impervious cover in the Borough of Madison, as well as changes in impervious cover over time. Using the most recent information available on impervious cover, from the United States Geological Survey’s National Land Cover Database, we found that 17 percent of Madison (480 of 2768 acres) is classified as impervious. Impervious cover includes surfaces such as asphalt, concrete, brick, or stone, which are materials that prevent absorption of rainfall. Such cover plays a major role in flooding in our built environment. We also found that between 2001 and 2016, an additional 20 acres of land changed from pervious to impervious. Although Madison Borough is often described as “built-out,” implying that lands are fully developed, in-fill and land use change continues to be an area of concern, particularly since major storm events are expected to increase in frequency.

    Historic Preservation Element

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Borough of Madison has long been aware of its history, and the community is proud of the role buildings from the past play in defining a place that is enjoyed by long-time residents and newcomers alike. The Borough included a Historic Preservation Element in its 1992 Master Plan. That version did not meet SJ guidelines for this action. An update to several elements of the Master Plan, including the Historic Preservation element, took place in 2020. The update process included public surveys, virtual public meetings and stakeholder meetings. The update was presented to the Planning Board on November 17, 2020, and had previously been reviewed and commented on by the Master Plan Steering Committee, including a representative of the Historic Preservation Commission. A final draft was made available to the public and a public hearing was held on December 15, 2020, at a special session of the Planning Board, wherein the Board unanimously approved and adopted the Master Plan (see minutes). The Executive Summary and Action Plan (strategies) for the Historic Preservation Element can be found on page 19-22 of the Master Plan Executive Summary. The Appendix contains a brief history of Madison (p. 57), Historic Preservation links (p. 59) and Existing Conditions Scan (p. 82). Madison includes two historic districts and several individual properties that are on the National and State Registers of Historic Places and a number more that have been deemed eligible. A Historic Preservation Commission was established by ordinance in 1993 (amended in 1999). The HPC has advisory responsibilities to review Planning Board or Zoning Board applications for properties in historic districts or on historic sites designated on the Zoning Map. That ordinance is currently in the process of being updated; a draft is not yet available. The Historic Preservation Commission has reviewed applications for renovations, rehabilitation, and yes, demolition, and have offered guidance to historic property owners in keeping the architectural qualities of Madison while allowing the community to continue to develop to meet modern needs.

  • Local Economies

    Buy Local Campaign

    10 Points

    Program Summary: We are invoking the adjusted lookback period for this action since the documentation is from 2019. Previous narrative: The idea of shopping locally in Madison has been around for decades. The Madison Chamber of Commerce (Chamber) formed in the 1940's. The Madison Borough Council created the Downtown Development Commission (DDC) in the early 1980's. Our local newspaper, the Madison Eagle, has also promoted shopping locally for years. Since a March 2008 Letter to the Editor from Gary Johnson appeared in the Eagle, advocating for residents to shop in Madison’s downtown, an extensive following for the “shop local” movement has developed. The Shop Madison Committee represents a partnership between the Borough, the Chamber and the DDC. Shop Madison campaigns with buttons, totes, road signs and a program encouraging people to “take the Pledge” to shop locally in Madison, to give up the internet and big box shopping habits and spread the word. The idea behind the Pledge is for people to remember that spending money helps our economy. Shoppers are also asked to subscribe to our e-newsletter and/or “like” our Facebook page, "I Love Madison, NJ,” which has a large following of nearly 5,800 people (https://www.facebook.com/shopmadison). The campaign also uses other social media such as Twitter (https://twitter.com/ilovemadisonnj) and Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/ilovemadisonnj/) to keep the public informed about events and the benefits of shopping locally. Promotional materials and programs include “The Top Ten Reasons to Shop Madison.” The town hosts several events such as the Farmer's Market, Ladies Night, Downtown Concert Series and Taste of Madison to encourage the public to come downtown and be exposed to the many local shops and eateries. A concert series is being held again this summer and the annual Holiday Arts Festival the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving encourage residents to come downtown to listen to some music then shop or go out to dinner.

    Support Local Businesses

    10 Points

    Program Summary: We are invoking the adjusted lookback period for this action since the documentation is from 2019. Previous narrative: In the 1980's, the Borough of Madison developed the Downtown Development Commission (DDC). The DDC is a mayoral appointed commission consisting of residents and business owners, members of the Planning Board, Board of Education, Chamber of Commerce, as well as representatives from the senior community, and commuters, among others. Among the purposes of the DDC as defined in the Borough Code Section 15-1 are coordinating redevelopment activities in the downtown district and fostering a closer working relationship between all segments of the Madison community. The Commission, with the help of merchants, residents, and the non-profit community, underwrites and sponsors several major events each year. The DDC supports Madison's business district in many ways and organizes various promotions including: Bottle Hill Day, May Day, Taste of Madison; and the Farmers Market. For a fuller description of the DDC and its activities, see the overview uploaded below. The Downtown Development Commission Web page is http://www.rosenet.org/371/Downtown-Development-Commission . The DDC also promotes Madison businesses with its Shop Madison campaign (see Buy Local action) and its Madison Marketplace e-newsletter (sample uploaded) and I Love Madison, NJ Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/ilovemadisonnj/ ), which has more than 5,500 “likes”. Rosenet, the Borough website, has a section devoted to Main Street Business Development, with subsections on Opening a Business in Madison, a downtown parking map with shopper parking noted, and 10 Reasons to Shop Madison.

  • Natural Resources

    Natural Resource Inventory

    20 Points
    Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary: Madison Borough published its first NRI/ERI in 1982, incorporating it as an element of the Master Plan. It was comprehensively updated in 2001 and a section on household recycling was added in 2004. In 2013, the Borough adopted as a part of its Master Plan a thoroughly updated ERI completed in December 2011. The 2011 ERI addresses significant changes in the landscape of Madison, including the addition of 53 acres that have been annexed from Florham Park and dedicated to open space and recreation. Additional changes addressed in this ERI include Morris County’s acquisition of the Moraine property as public parkland, initiation of a home composing program, other changes to both the landscape of the borough and the availability of higher quality resources and data. The ERI includes all new mapping (19 in total) that address Roads, Land Use/Land Cover, Topography, Surface Geology, Wellhead Protection Areas & Contaminated Sites, Surface Waters, Flooding, Soils, Groundwater Recharge, Hydric Soils, Prime Agricultural Soils, Vegetated Lands, Wetlands, Tree Canopy, Open Space, Land Use Change (2002-2007), Impervious Surface (two sources: USGS and NJDEP) and an aerial map. The MEC will review the ERI annually at a minimum, and will amend and add appendices as required, as it did in 2004 with the addition of the Recycling section. The next additions that the MEC is preparing are the Wildlife Pledge and the Inventory of Conservation Easements. The updates will be presented to the Planning Board for inclusion in the Master Plan. The Madison Environmental Commission received a Smart Planning Assistance Grant from the Association of New Jersey Environmental Commission; contracted with H2M, a multi-disciplined professional consulting firm operation since 1933, to assist in the preparation of the ERI in consultatation with MEC members and Borough staff; and used volunteer hours and Green Fair revenues to complete the document.

    Environmental Commission

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Summer and fall of 2019 saw continuation of past environmental commission events. On October 19, 2019, we ran our second annual Town-Wide Yard sale, aimed at both reducing waste and reducing consumption. We hope to repeat this event for a third time this coming fall. Education and outreach were conducted at a Welcome Madison program June 8, 2019, and at the annual town fair, Bottle Hill Day, October 5, 2019. On September 25, 2019, the Madison Environmental Commission (MEC) organized its first self-guided tour of energy efficient buildings and native plant gardens in the borough. The MEC also sponsored environmental presentations, jointly with Madison Public Library, including film screenings, recycling workshops, ecological gardening information, and native plant seed workshops. In January 2020, the MEC invited members of Sustainable Princeton to give a presentation, about affordable sustainable housing. This was a regional event and was well-attended by Madison officials and residents, as well as officials and residents of at least ten nearby towns. We are unable to distribute milkweed and other pollinator-friendly seedlings at the annual earth week Green Fair or the annual Madison May Day cleanup events this year, so seedlings are being ordered online and will be dropped off curbside. Ecological gardening and educational outreach is being offered by email or online this spring. Following our “Plastic Free Week” last April, Madison passed its single use plastic bag ban, ordinance # 4-2020, that went into effect on March 1, 2020. This was supported by two plastic use education events. Due to the pandemic, the MEC postponed its third annual Green Vision Forum. In the past, this community forum connected students from all five public schools, plus Drew University, with borough officials to explore what an even greener Madison would look like. Our third annual Town Swap, a free exchange of goods, scheduled for April 25, 2020, was postponed to avoid social contact. There was also a sustainable clothing presentation at the library in October.

    Environmental Commission Site Plan Review

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Environmental Commission has been busy this year, reviewing several commercial site plans and providing more robust comments, which reference the updated Madison Master Plan and the state Energy Master Plan. The EC has also been working with the town to improve the process of notification and timeline. It has often happened that the EC has been noticed to comment late in the application process, limiting the ability to review site plans at EC meetings. Recently, the chair of the EC has been invited to provide comments earlier in the process — at the Technical Coordinating Committee phase (where the application is reviewed for completeness before being presented to the entire Zoning Board for hearing). Also, due to COVID, Zoning Board meetings are virtual, and all the documents relating to each site plan application have been digitized and made available on the Planning section of the Borough website once an application has been added to the hearing schedule (which is helpful during hearings but too late for comments). In addition, the EC has been delegating sections of the site plan for review - e.g., landscaping, stormwater - and has added new reviewers with engineering experience. Also, as a result of the newly adopted Master Plan and the state Energy Master Plan, which push toward green development, the Planning Board is updating the existing Preliminary Environmental Checklist required for all site plan applications. The final update to this checklist as well as an ordinance amending the Land Use chapter (195) of the Borough code to reference this updated checklist is being submitted under the Green Development Checklist action. A copy of the Preliminary Environmental Checklist and a recently filled out checklist are submitted, along with a spreadsheet listing all site plan reviews for through May 2021 and examples of EC review submissions.

    Open Space Plans

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Borough of Madison's 2020 Open Space and Recreation Plan Update to the 2009 edition was approved as an element of the Master Plan by the Planning Board at their February 18, 2020 meeting and memorialized by resolution at the March 3 meeting. The Plan Update was created by The Land Conservancy of New Jersey with help and support from the Madison Open Space, Recreation & Historic Preservation Advisory Committee, Recreation Advisory Committee, Director of Business Development-Madison Downtown Development Commission, and Borough Staff, including the Borough Administrator, the CFO and Assistant Administrator, Director of Recreation, Borough Clerk and Borough Planner. Various short-term, mid-term, long-term, and ongoing actions have been outlined in the plan, including the preservation of historically significant areas, protection of the Buried Valley Aquifer, and creation and stewardship of open space and recreational facilities, including trails. The plan meets the 10 requirements outlined in the action description. Agendas for the required public meetings can be found in Appendix of the plan document uploaded below. Please see the uploaded document for further information.

    Easement Inventory and Outreach

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Borough of Madison has a modest number of conservation and historic easements but until this undertaking had no centralized inventory of this data and no monitoring program. The Sustainable Madison Committee and Environmental Commission partnered with Borough officials to remedy this problem. They carried out their work between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Harriet Honigfeld, of the Sustainable Madison Committee, conducted research via the Morris County Clerk's web site and database, scoured municipal tax maps, contacted the New Jersey Historic Trust and Great Swamp Watershed Association, and followed up on leads from the Borough Engineer and other committee members with knowledge of recent subdivisions and other potential easements. The Municipal Clerk delved through municipal files and meeting minutes and shared her findings. Ms. Honigfeld prepared an Excel spreadsheet of the information she obtained with fields for ownership information, deed book and page, date conveyed, acreage, location, type of easement, etc. Dan Buckelew of the Engineering Department then prepared maps of the various easements, updated tax maps, and created an overall map of the municipality's conservation and historic easements. A group of Environmental Commission members developed a brochure about Madison's conservation easements to mail to affected landowners and distribute to other interested residents. They also drafted outreach letters to apprise landowners of the easements on their property and set up monitoring appointments. Madison's Administrative Official for Planning and Zoning mailed the letters and set up the appointments for May 2013. Following the May site inspections, the project team realized that supplemental research would help strengthen the inventory and better enable the borough to bring landowners into compliance with the terms of the easements. The Borough ordered 60-year title searches for properties on the easement inventory. In the future, Madison hopes to secure funding to survey each easement.

    Easement Inspections and Evaluations

    15 Points

    Program Summary: Madison Borough instituted a formal conservation easement record-keeping and monitoring program in the last year. Because the municipality is mostly built out, the number of easements for which Madison has oversight responsibilities is very manageable. For this Easement Inspection and Evaluation action, the project team firmed up the monitoring and record keeping process, conducted outreach to landowners with eased parcels, and performed baseline site inspections of the easements. After researching available data, the team created an inventory of Madison’s conservation and historic easements. They then mapped the easements, determined which ones needed to be monitored by the borough, selected volunteers and staff to visit the sites, and scheduled appointments for May 2013. To educate landowners and the public, the Madison Environmental Commission designed a 2-page color brochure defining conservation easements and explaining their importance to the community. The Borough sent letters to landowners with eased properties. The monitoring team visited the easements, completed monitoring forms, and created files for each easement. The monitors identified potential easement violations, and the borough proposed additional steps to help bring the properties into compliance and confirm easement boundaries and terms. Follow-up communication with the landowners will be needed. Depending on the issue, subsequent outreach will be handled by the Environmental Commission, Planning and Zoning Official, Municipal Engineer, Code Enforcement Officer, Tax Assessor, or Municipal Counsel or a combination of staff and volunteers.

    Environmental Assessment Ordinance

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Madison Borough has required by ordinance and code an environmental impact assessment since the original ordinance (Ord. 2-84) was adopted in 1984, creating Ch. 195 of the code. There is no signed copy of the ordinance available, only the code book for Chapter 195 and the online code. The documentation below provides excerpts from that Chapter. The Borough Code can be found at: https://ecode360.com/MA0608?needHash=true According to the Preliminary Environmental Checklist (PEC) that is part of the Site Application Packet, the Borough's Technical Coordinating Committee, along with the Environmental Commission, determines whether and Environmental Impact Statement is required. The introductory language in the PEC states that an EIS is recommended for "all site plan and subdivision proposals that could result in a probable adverse impact on the quality of the environment or are in a critical area." The submission requirements for an EIS are in Ordinance 195-20.F.

    Tree Protection Ordinance

    10 Points

    Program Summary: In 2008, Madison established the Shade Tree Management Board to protect and manage all trees on public property. Attached is Chapter 45 of Madison code. On Feburary 24, 2020, Madison's Council passed a Tree Protection Ordinance to manage trees on private property. Attached are a signed copy of the ordinance and Chapter 178 of Madison code, which is accessible online at https://ecode360.com/35532069

    Community Forestry Management Plan and NJUCF Accreditation

    20 Points

    Program Summary: Madison's Shade Tree Management Board (STMB) was formally created by the Mayor and Council in 2001. More information on this organization can be found at http://www.rosenet.org/480/Shade-Tree-Management-Board In partnership with the Borough, many volunteers, and other like organizations such as the Friends of Madison Shade Trees, the STMB has been an effective advocate for tree and woodland management. The attached documents are: -2019 Annual Accomplishment Report -2019 Approved Accreditation Status -Approved Community Forestry Plan -2019 Annual Accomplishment Report -Community Forestry Plan - 2019 NJ Approved Status -Madison's Approved Community Forestry Plan

    Tree Hazard Inventory

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Madison's Tree Hazard Inventory Program is described in more detail in the attached documents but the main points of the program are: -Maintaining an accurate street tree database which tracks, tree removals, new planting sites, streets/trees that need pruning and the status conditions of trees. In 2015, Madison removed 174 dead or dying trees, and pruned 268 trees/15 streets, some of which had hazardous limbs removed. The newly attached Madison Tree Specie / Condition SpreadSheet Report identifies the tree condition and species in its database tracking system. The previous submitted maps are a graphical representations of this report. The condition status is determined by whether the tree has problems with disease, roots or general decline. As you can see from above, Madison has a very pro-active tree removal/replacement program which eliminates dead or dying trees - whatever the reason. If there is a specific issue identified, like the Emerald Ash Borer, we survey every ash street tree (Madison has 250 ash street trees and as of September, 2016 there were no reports of Emerald Ash Borer infected trees). In addition, Madison's Electric Department conducts line clearance programs on any street that has tree/electric lines hazardous conditions. -A very responsive resident tree contact system where, in 2015 everyone of the 124 contacts was resolved. Residents are usually are the 1st to report hazardous tree conditions. -Annual Madison resources dedicated to tree maintenance includes $706,301 of Borough resources and $96,000 of volunteer contributions. Much of these consists of Borough Employee Salary & Wages ($458,241) and tree removals/maintenance pruning ($122,400 -includes contracted resources).

    Tree Maintenance Programs

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Shade Tree Management Board (STMB) oversaw budgets of $130,500 in 2019 and $154,500 in 2020. The annual increase reflected the hiring of a part-time city Arborist to implement the Tree Protection Ordinance and respond to resident requests regarding public trees. Tree pruning, removal and stump removal are done by DPW or Honor Tree, a private, local contractor. Line clearance is done by Madison Electric Department. STMB meets monthly in person or through Zoom if circumstances warrant. The meetings include liaisons from Madison Environmental Commission, DPW, Madison Parks Committee, Borough Council, Borough Communications, Friends of Madison Shade Trees, Madison Borough Arborist, Borough Engineer. In 2020 (first year of the Ordinance) the Arborist issued 112 permits to residents to remove a total of 253 private trees. Permit fees collected were $4,725. There were no contributions to the Madison Tree Fund in lieu of replanting. In 2019 each quadrant of Madison was surveyed twice to find planting sites, damaged trees, removal candidates, stumps. In 2020 only the spring survey was completed due to COVID 19. The 2019 survey results determined planting sites but in spite of ordering trees for spring 2020 delivery was not made until fall of 2020 when 112 trees were planted. The fall 2020 survey did not take place. In 2019; 105 public trees were planted, 68 pruned, 89 removed. In 2020; 112 public trees were planted, 120 pruned, 140 removed (many damaged in a spring tornado) Data on public trees is maintained in ArborPro by STMB members, DPW staff and in 2019, two interns trained in identification by the Borough Arborist.

    Tree Planting Programs

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Madison's Tree Planting Programs are described in the attached documents but the highlights include: -Strong government financial support via the Shade Tree Management Board's budget and the use of Department of Public Works personnel/resources. In 2019, the total Shade Tree Management budget was $130,500 with $20,000 allocated for the purchase of trees -Planting of 108 street trees throughout the Borough -Special Project to Replace Pear Trees On Main St. -Special Project to Restore 14 Acres - Project includes the removal of invasive plants (mostly pears) and the planting of 150 tree seedlings and young trees along the edges of the restoration site. The 2019 planting was contracted to the NJ Tree Foundation. The main portion of the 14 acres will be brought back to a meadow. -Resident Request for a New Street Tree - a flyer was sent to all residents asking if they wanted a new street tree.159 responded yes and the goal is to plant as many as possible in 2020. -Value of Trees Arbor Day Education Program

  • Operations & Maintenance

    Adopt a Green Purchasing Policy by Resolution

    5 Points

    Program Summary: On May 29, 2019, the Madison Borough Council approved a resolution for a Green Purchasing Policy (first adopted June 10, 2013). In August, the Assistant Borough Administrator distribution this resolution and policy to all Department Heads via email. In addition, the Green Purchasing Policy was posted in the Sustainable Madison Committee section of the municipal Web site on the "Green Initiatives" page. To view it, please visit: http://www.rosenet.org/462/Green-Initiatives

    Green Maintenance Equipment and Materials

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Recently, Madison Borough has purchased some big-ticket items that qualify for this action, including LED streetlights, electric leaf blowers, park benches with recycled content and new, cleaner diesel heavy equipment that is eligible for 25% reimbursement under the state’s Clean Construction grant – a Komatsu front loader due to be delivered in mid-June (PO included) and a skid-steerer, for which bids are due in early June. Over the last couple of years, the town has purchased and installed new electric and water meters that allow moving to time-of-use rates to potentially reduce the burden of peak energy demand (sample invoice and resolutions in pdf document below; link to other meter invoices from 2019-2021 is https://1drv.ms/u/s!At3Yjjm6p4y_gQMOL_9sYB_gUiac?e=iOhZgx). Documentation also includes purchases of green bathroom cleaner and Scotch Magic greener tape. Our Purchasing Agent enrolled in a green purchasing webinar via DLGS, is researching green purchasing co-ops and setting up a system to track green purchases more easily. In addition, bids will be updated to include green/environmental specifications. One “purchaseless” green practice is eliminating plastic cups at the Borough Hall water coolers and instead using reusable containers. The chairs of the EC and the green team were invited to attend a Department Head meeting in February 2021 where each department head reported on sustainable practices and purchases in their departments and where the Borough Administrator made a point that going forward purchases should be screened with a sustainability lens. This meeting led to more awareness on the part of everyone on what others are doing and helped establish a relationship between the green team and the departments to follow up with additional discussions and cross-sharing of information. Another meeting is scheduled for June 28. We are excited to see awareness growing and leading to tangible results.

    Green Grounds & Maintenance Policy

    10 Points

    Program Summary: On May 29, 2019, The Borough of Madison Council approved a resolution again supporting the adoption of an environmentally-conscious grounds and maintenance policy (first adopted June 10, 2013). In August, the Assistant Borough Administrator share the resolution and policy statement via email with all Department Heads. The policy has been and will be considered in planning future landscaping as at the Madison Recreational Center (rain gardens, deer exclosure area, invasives removal), the public library (creation and signage of a no mow zone) and the water tower property on Madison Ave. (installation of irrigation system). Community groups and organizations, such as recreational sports programs and those dedicated to maintaining portions of municipal property like the Rose Garden or Borough Hall, will continue to be part of Sustainable Madison Advisory Committee outreach. Having environmentally-conscious municipal grounds has popular support among residents, as community vision has shown.. The latest Green Grounds & Maintenance Policy has been posted in the Sustainable Madison Committee section on the municipal Web site as part of the "Green Initiatives" page, replacing the 2013 resolution. It is accessed from this page: http://rosenet.org/462/Green-Initiatives The direct link to the resolution is http://rosenet.org/DocumentCenter/View/7485/R-184-2019SUPPORTING-THE-ADOPTION-OF-AN-ENVIRONMENTALLY-2?bidId=

    Efficient Landscape Design

    10 Points

    Program Summary: In 2019, the Borough of Madison Council is planning to approve a resolution readopting the environmentally-conscious green grounds and maintenance policy first approved on June 10, 2013, which is a pre-requisite for this action. Madison’s Efficient Landscape Design project, the re-landscaping of the Madison Train Station grounds, was completed in 2010 and continues to be maintained and improved by the Friends of Madison Train Station (FMTS). (see overview in documentation below). Note: On May 29, 2019, the Madison Borough Council approved a resolution for a Green Purchasing Policy (first adopted June 10, 2013). In August, the Assistant Borough Administrator distributed this resolution and policy to all Department Heads via email.

    Recycled Materials and Composting

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Borough does not compost on a large scale, though through the Madison Environmental Commission they promote backyard composting of plant waste. In relation to municipal parks, composting is done on site by practicing cut it and leave it, rather than bagging the grass clippings. Tree limbs and fallen trees are chipped and used around plants, trees, and municipal buildings throughout the Borough, including street trees and school properties as weed control. The documentation below includes photos of the DPW use of truckloads of collected wood chips recently on a path that runs from Delbarton Park to Rosedale Park and on two other trails. On a lesser scale, when an old concrete table and bench in one of the Borough's park were replaced by metal ones they were repainted and placed in the Madison Community Garden event area rather than put in the waste stream (photos included in documentation below) Note: On May 29, 2019, the Madison Borough Council approved a resolution for a Green Purchasing Policy (first adopted June 10, 2013). In August, the Assistant Borough Administrator distributed this resolution and policy to all Department Heads via email.

  • Public Information & Engagement

    Municipal Communications Strategy

    10 Points

    Program Summary: An inventory took place when the Communication & Technology Coordinator (PIO) began in April of 2018. Supplying information to the administration, the PIO suggested broadening the social media outreach (to include Twitter), update and broaden media contact lists, navigate away from Nixle and utilize the county’s new system AlertMorris (AlertMadison) – this is taking effect 11/1. Communication is ever changing, and as communication outlets change, Madison looks into the best possible way to communicate to our residents. Our Communication & Technology Coordinator (PIO) combs through the website and updates as needed. See checklist. Also see our Online Municipal Communications Strategy, Emergency Communications Planning and Vulnerable Populations actions.

    Improve Public Engagement in Municipal Government

    15 Points

    Program Summary: Checklist and required supplementary documentation have been uploaded. One of the silver linings of COVID has been the discovery of how effective virtual public meetings can be. Participation is often increased. This is something to keep in mind going forward, toward perhaps creating a hybrid of virtual and in-person meetings, so that the benefits of each are not lost.

    Online Municipal Public Service Systems

    15 Points

    Program Summary: See revised checklist and OMPS Web Pages pdf below.

    Digitizing Public Information

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The Communication Technology Coordinator (PIO) oversees the borough website and social media channels. Throughout the year, board/advisories/commissions/committees submit (as required by law) agendas and then approved minutes which are posted in their respective agenda centers within the Rosenet website. When they are posted, residents who have registered for select agendas (through Notify Me(R)) will receive a text or email notification informing them that an agenda and/or minutes have been posted, along with a link. This allows residents the ability to see ahead of time whether they should attend a meeting, and without having to waste a printed copy of an agenda. Madison is always looking at ways to provide more information to residents throughout online presence, Rosenet (website), social media, applications, etc. Just as they are evolving, Madison is evolving as well. In reply to your comment about the Planning Board not listing members, please see http://nj-madisonborough.civicplus.com/458/Members See checklist, which has been updated, per the reviewer's comments.

  • Sustainability & Climate Planning

    Municipal Carbon Footprint

    10 Points
    Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary: The Municipal Carbon Footprint Calculator for the year 2020 was completed (supplied as a supporting doc) and totals 4286 equivalent metric tons of CO2. Data was collected and analyzed by the Sustainable Madison Committee, two key Borough employees, Robert Duffy and Kevin O’Keefe and a Drew University Intern, Max Drucker. Sheet 1 of the workbook (supporting document) has additional columns showing the 2018 and 2019 values for the total and key components. No weather corrections were applied. Of these, emissions due to Natural Gas used in buildings were 503.4 tons (down 4.6% from 2019), those due to electricity in buildings and wells 2098.6 tons (down 4.2%) and those due to vehicles were 537.7 tons (down 7.1% ). Decreases in all categories are likely due to COVID. The vehicle emissions were derived from the 2020 Fleet Inventory, submitted as a separate SJ Action. The wastewater treatment data (excel rows 25 and 41) accounts for (a) the energy consumed in sewage treatment and (b) the effect of methane capture from the anaerobic digestion process. Per discussions with Sustainable NJ, we show no results for solid-waste-related activities here, but will show a complete model for that in the Community footprint. Thru the Municipal Energy Efficiency Action Madison seeks to reduce energy consumption and emissions. The Committee intends to update the Footprint annually, as a metric for emissions reduction and Gold Star – Energy certification.

    Community Carbon Footprint

    10 Points

    Program Summary: The 2020 Madison Community Carbon Footprint (CCF) is complete. The impact of the Covid pandemic is apparent. The 2020 Madison footprint is 171,293 Metric Tons CO2e, down 10% from 2019. Sheet 1 of the submitted workbook has additional columns showing the 2018 and 2019 values for key components. Emissions due to Natural Gas were 46,064 tons (27% of the total and down 11% from 2019). The large decrease in Natural Gas-caused emissions is partially due to the pandemic closures of some businesses, schools and Drew University. Emissions due to electricity were 73,380 tons (43% of total and down 2%). This was calculated with the emission factor found in the calculator tool, (1312 pounds CO2e per MWh) which is high compared with current estimates of the emissions for NJ electricity. For the electricity and gas consumption, worksheets have been added providing weather-adjusted normalizations. Those adjustments are NOT part of the values reported on sheet 1. Emissions due to vehicles were 53,407 tons (31% of total and down 20%). For the vehicle emissions, we noted in 2019 that the changes between 2018 and 2019 were negligible. In addition, the NJTPA emission survey scheduled for 2020 has not yet published its results. Hence we used the 2019 emission values and the FHA VMT estimates for 2020 (New Jersey, urban arterial) and found that New Jersey’s VMT for 2020 decreased 20.3% from 2019. This factor yielded the 2020 vehicle emission values. Data was collected by the Sustainable Madison Committee, several Borough employees, Robert Duffy, Donna Carey and Kevin O’Keefe. Since we are doing this every year, we have drafted a detailed Instruction for the Madison CCF and include the current draft as a supporting document.

    Community Asset Mapping

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Recently voted best place to live in New Jersey, the town of Madison has much to share with residents and visitors. The community asset mapping project enables those familiar with Madison to contribute their vision of what Madison means to them and to share that vision with newcomers. The map also offers a visual platform for engaging community members on place-based planning and a mechanism to see where gaps are present and where opportunities exist to better meet the needs of all people who live, work and play in Madison. We created our current Community Asset Map by starting with the three key components of our last map: local businesses, open space and parks, and local non-profit and community organizations important to residents and visitors. We updated and extended our work to include schools, public transportation, historical districts and properties and property uses, using the ArcGIS StoryMap platform. We also have plans to extend our current map to include additional natural and cultural resources, including school gardens and legacy trees.

    Community Visioning

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Madison conducted its second Green Forum on June 14, 2017 to update its community vision. The first green forum, in 2013, successfully produced a list of goals that Madison has been working toward. The forum format in both years was similar. Attendees divided into three break-out groups led by experts in those topics. Each of the three topic leaders then led a 20 to 30-minute discussion, participants rotating from one group to the next. The three topics chosen for 2017 were 1 Greening our Yards; 2 Lowering our Energy Use; 3 Reducing our Trash. The forum wrapped up with the opportunity to join an email list and a subcommittee in one of the topics. Informative handouts were available. Madison school students provided a poster session highlighting several important issues. In a revised format, Madison initiated a student Green Vision Forum on April 12, 2018 and repeated the format on March 14, 2019. This annual event allows Madison students to inform borough leaders of their environmental concerns and proposed solutions. Green teams and science classes from Madison's elementary, junior and high schools, and students from Drew University presented their visions for a greener Madison. The 2018 forum included presentations on short showers, bike swaps, reusable water bottles and idling at school pick-ups. Topics in 2019 included bottle caps to benches, plastic bag use, composting, straw use, water bottles and campus sustainability. In both years, Mayor Conley and town officials attended and invited students to address the council directly. Community Vision Statement 2019 is included in Borough Resolution R248-2019, approved by the Madison Borough Council on August 12, 2019. At their August 12 meeting, the Sustainable Madison Advisory Committee (SMAC) voted unanimously to approve Community Vision Statement 2019. Approved minutes will be posted on the Borough website at http://www.rosenet.org/AgendaCenter/Search/?term=&CIDs=16,&startDate=&endDate=&dateRange=&dateSelector= after September 17.

  • Waste Management

    Prescription Drug Safety and Disposal

    10 Points
    Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary: We are counting this as a carryover action. During the early stages of the pandemic, the police building where one of the dropboxes was located was mostly closed to residents. Currently, the box is accessible and we did promote a take-back day on April 24, 2021. Previously: Madison has continued with its emphasis on proper waste management of drugs. These have included locked waste disposal units at the police station and at the local neighborhood pharmacy. The Madison Policy Department installed and maintains a prescription drug disposal drop box, which was provided by the Morris County Prevention is Key (http://www.mcpik.org/) Program. Donations to the drop box are anonymous. When the box is full, coordinators from the Morris County Prevention is Key program transport the contents to an incinerator. The program began in 2013, and the first full box was picked up June 4, 2013. Police Chief Darren P. Dachisen, Sr., states “Our lobby drug collection box is one of the busiest in the county I have been told. Since its inception on June 4, 2013 we have collected approximately 3,651 lbs. of medication with our 85th collection from the Morris County Sheriff’s Office occurring just yesterday [May 22, 2019]. MCSO empties the box about every 3 weeks or so." To supplement the police department drop box, the Madison Pharmacy also collects expired or unused prescription drugs, using a box maintained by the American Medicine Chest Challenge. The pharmacy staff do not maintain information about the type, number or volume of prescriptions collected. The staff do remove and shred identifying information on prescription bottles. The disposal boxes are listed on borough, county, state and national websites, and are broadcast through social media and informational sessions at the borough Senior Center and Farmer's Markets. Notification to residents is made through notices at the Police Department disposal location; through the Madison Pharmacy, the Madison Chatham Coalition (local drug awareness group), the borough website’s Health Department pages (rosenet.org); Facebook pages; and the state N.J. Consumer Awareness website. Plans for 2019 include outreach to borough funeral homes and assisted living venues with educational materials and Terra bags for disposal. In 2019 approximately 607 pounds of medication was collected. In 2020 389 pounds were collected.

    Recycling and Waste Reduction Education and Compliance

    15 Points
    Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary: Marking complete in compliance with adjusted lookback period. The Borough of Madison has dramatically increased the communications and outreach regarding recycling over the past two years, and especially in the last six months. An updated 2019 recycling newsletter was distributed to all residents, that made clear which materials are acceptable or not acceptable for curb-side pick-up recycling, and encouraged residents to try the recycle coach app. Recycling topics were centrally featured in the Madison Green Vision Forum (in March 2019), at the Madison Green Fair, and through Plastic-Free Week in Madison Outreach. The town swap, town wide yard sale (in spring and fall), and the annual bike swap further communicated the motivation to reduce household waste, to reuse materials, and to limit materials sent to landfill. New programming included film screening at the library, including “Bag it.”

    Community Paper Shredding Day

    5 Points

    Program Summary: Rotary Club of Madison has held semi-annual paper shredding events since 2008, in April and again in October. The October 2020 event was the most successful ever, generating more than $3,000 to be used by Rotary for annual grants and sponsorships to local charities and non-profits and five $1,000 college scholarships to Madison seniors. The March 2021 event collected 38 cubic yards of paper. In addition, Habitat for Humanity was on site collecting gently used or new items for resale in their ReStore to help support local home building efforts and prevent the items from going to a land fill. Also on site was the Madison High School Interact Club collecting food for First Baptist Church food pantry. People using the shredding service came from Madison, Florham Park, Far Hills, Chatham, Westfield, and Short Hills among others. Madison Borough supports this event by providing space in a borough parking lot (# 1) and traffic control. The Rotary Club has submitted a Certificate of Liability Insurance naming the Borough of Madison as an additional insured. Attached are the borough resolutions supporting and an article from the Madison Eagle publicizing the event.

    Food Waste

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Food Waste Recycling in Madison Borough The Madison Environmental Commission has been actively promoting backyard composting in recent years. Last year, the MEC invited Java Bradley from Java’s Composting to its September 2019 meeting to learn about their curbside food waste pickup service. Java’s began picking up food waste from local residents in April of 2020. This article was published in May about the service: https://amadisonmom.net/blog/composting?rq=compost (see pdf below). The MEC is planning a number of educational programs to inform residents of the importance of organics waste recycling and to increase the number of subscribers to the curbside pickup service. A community-led compost forum is also planned which will include a myth busters segment and Q&A. In addition, the borough is planning to submit a grant application to the USDA for a composting pilot program to be located at the DPW. Madison has an ideal location for such a pilot. It would enable the town to retain some of the leaves it currently ships to Pennsylvania each fall and to recycle food waste. If Madison is not awarded the grant, a smaller pilot is still planned. When the pilot program is up and running, Java’s will bring local food waste to the DPW for processing instead of delivering it to the facility they currently use in Andover, NJ. Residents who prefer not to pay for curbside pickup will be able to bring food waste to the DPW themselves. The goal is to, over time, increase the amount of food waste the borough can recycle locally, eventually expanding the scope from the residential population to include schools and restaurants. The sources of food waste will be analyzed in the summer of 2020.

    Non-Mandated Materials Recycling

    25 Points

    Program Summary: 1) a textile recycling drop-off bin (5 points - textiles, shoes, handbags) was installed at our recycling depot in September 2021-impact report included; 2) although the County only mandates recycling of #1 and #2 plastics, Madison's hauler accepts #5 – 10 points – this is not separated out from other plastics in the tonnage report – see residential plastic containers; 3) Residents can include non-mandated milk and other paper beverage cartons in their paper recycling; 4) telephone books can be included with paper recycling. Both 3&4 are included under residential/other paper in the 2020 tonnage report. And just for the fun of it: 5) pumpkin recycling happens seasonally in the fall and has been promoted on social media as far back as 2019; residents can bring their pumpkins to the recycling depot or add them to their leaves/yard waste for curbside pickup.

    Recycling Depot

    10 Points

    Program Summary: Although Madison has had a recycling depot for many years, a new and more easily accessible recycling depot was built in 2020. The new depot is open with expanded hours to residents and local businesses on Tuesdays and Fridays from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm and Saturdays from 8:00 am to 2:30 pm. All items accepted curbside can also be brought to the recycling depot, as well as TVs and computer monitors with tubes, and yard waste (seasonal, including Christmas trees). In response to the dramatic increase in online shopping due to COVID, a cardboard compactor was added to the depot this year, allowing the borough to collect more cardboard, reduce the number of pick-ups and associated fees, while also keeping the center clean (see photos in attached documentation). The Borough of Madison applies annually for a grant the funds from which are used for repairs and fixes to the recycling depot, recycling cans downtown, etc. Please see attached documentation for map, photos, Facebook post and the 2021 Recycling Newsletter which was distributed to all borough residents. 2019 recycling and yard waste: Recycling tonnage: 1179.08 (breakdown not provided by Waste Management) Yard waste: 2,385 compacted yards 2020 recycling and yard waste: Cardboard/paper: 891.719 tons Commingled: 777.27 tons Total tonnage: 1668.989 tons Yard waste: 3904 compacted yards

    Backyard Composting Program

    5 Points

    Program Summary: Madison's backyard composting program was launched in 2009 and has been ongoing since that time. Since our last submission, Madison residents purchased 16 composters and 7 rain barrels in 2019, 29 composters and 3 rain barrels in 2020 and, to date in 2021, 15 composters and 6 rain barrels. These numbers include only those purchases made through Madison Environmental Commission’s (MEC) sales and do not include composters residents may have purchased independently. Multiple informational programs have also been provided to educate Madison residents about the importance of composting and the best practices for doing so. The MEC has promoted these sales and programs through press releases, flyers, the MEC newsletter, social media and online on the borough website at rosenet.org. Madison’s backyard composting initiative is complemented by the promotion of a curbside compost pickup service offered by Java’s Compost. Additionally, a compost drop off site at the borough’s new recycling depot will be added this year offering Madison residents an additional cost-effective option for composting their food waste. The Madison Community Garden continues to maintain compost bins for the plant material grown at that site. 2019 sale: see documentation for flyer 2020 sale: https://www.rosenet.org/1334/MEC-Composter-Sale 2021 sale: https://morristownshipmadison.company.site Informational programs: https://www.rosenet.org/1339/Getting-Started-with-Home-Composting https://www.rosenet.org/1337/MEC-Composting-Eco-Tip-Forum https://www.rosenet.org/1318/Composting-Simplified Please see documentation for a sampling of Facebook posts, MEC newsletters and flyers.

    Grass - Cut It and Leave It Program

    5 Points

    Program Summary: Invoking adusted lookback period since none of our usual in-person distribution methods took place in 2020. We continue to distribute a hard copy Cut It and Leave It brochure that was developed in 2013 based on the NJDEP brochure, updated to include NJ Fertilizer Law, and reviewed by ANJEC and Morris Co. Coop Extension. It was available as a handout at the 2019 Green Fair and continues to be available on the Sustainable Madison website (http://www.sustainablemadisonnj.org/lawn-care.html) and on the Sustainable Madison page of the Borough website (http://www.rosenet.org/447/Sustainable-Madison-Committee) under Environmentally Friendly Lawn Care. In the brochure, we ask residents to share it with their landscapers.

    Materials Reuse Program

    10 Points

    Program Summary: We are including actions from 2019 per the Adjusted Lookback Period, but this action is current. We held a tri-town yard sale in 2020 and one on April 17, 2021, with neighboring Chatham Borough and Chatham Township. In 2021, 114 people participated and the $10 listing fee raised $1,140 for the nonprofit Great Swamp Watershed Association. A digital map showed the locations of all registered participants and the event was posted to garage sale groups. Sales were brisk and homeowners seemed receptive to not putting their leftovers out on the curb. See the 2021 Spring Yard Sale media documentation. Another yard sale is scheduled for September 25, 2021. New for 2021 is a Madison Swap and Share Facebook private group, which started in July 2020 and already has 1.9K members among a community of 16,000 residents (see pdf below). On May 19, 2019, as in previous years, Madison held its annual Community Bike Swap at the Central Ave. School, with 50% of proceeds going to Peaceworks and 50% to the Central Ave. School Garden. On April 28, 2018, and again on May 11, 2019, Madison held a town swap at the DPW Municipal Garage. This event was organized by Madison Environmental Commission and was well attended. On October 13, 2018, Madison held its first town wide yard sale. Residents interested in holding garage sales were encouraged to hold them all on that day. Any household that chose to do so, could have its address listed on a map of locations. The map was made available online to interested shoppers. The event was very well attended, and another town Yard sale was planned for Saturday October 12, 2019.

    Reusable Bag Education Program

    5 Points

    Program Summary: We are invoking the adjusted lookback period since our documentation is from 2019. The reusable bag education program, undertaken by the Madison Environmental Commission with strong Borough support, came out of a larger concern about single-use disposable plastics. Plastics, including single-use plastic straws, drink lids, water bottles, and bags were centrally featured in the Madison Green Vision Forum (in March 2019), at the Madison Green Fair, and through Plastic-Free Week in Madison (April 27 – May 4). Two film screenings took place this past year, including a documentary on the New Jersey Highlands and the film “Bag it.” Plastic bags also emerged as a central area of concern regarding litter, river cleanups, and storm water management in our town.