Sustainable Jersey Community Certification Report

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This is the Sustainable Jersey Certification Report of Camden City (Camden), a Sustainable Jersey silver certified applicant.

Camden City (Camden) was certified on November 11, 2016 with 350 points. Listed below is information regarding Camden City (Camden)’s Sustainable Jersey efforts and materials associated with the applicant’s certified actions.

Contact Information

The designated Sustainable Jersey contact for Camden City (Camden) is:

Name:Joe Thomas
Title/Position:Economic Development Rep / Planning & development
Address:P.O. Box 95120 Suite 1300
Camden, NJ 08102
Phone:856-968-3531

Sustainability Actions Implemented

Each approved action and supporting documentation for which Camden City (Camden) was approved for in 2016 appears below. Note: Standards for the actions below may have changed and the documentation listed may no longer satisfy requirements for that action. Additionally, points associated with actions prior to 2013 certifications may not be accurate.

  • Brownfields

    Brownfields Inventory & Prioritization

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Camden Redevelopment Agency (CRA) has, since 2005, managed the Brownfield Program for the City of Camden. During that time the CRA has been awarded nearly $38.0 million in grants for the purpose of investigation and remediation of Brownfield Sites. Currently, the CRA is managing $12.0 million in active State and Federal Brownfield grants. As redevelopment activity has gained momentum in Camden and the competition for Brownfield funding has increased, the CRA recognized that a strategic plan was required to guide the allocation of resources and ensure alignment of Brownfield projects with various City, State and regional plans. In order to address this need, the Camden Redevelopment Agency engaged the US Environmental Protection Agency-funded, New Jersey Institute of Technology Technical Assistance for Brownfield Communities (NJIT TAB) Program to develop a document entitled “City of Camden Brownfield Redevelopment Strategic Plan” (2014) The CRA has partnered with the Camden Collaborative Initiative's (CCI) Land & Brownfield working group to serve as the central Brownfield Development Committee. The Land & Brownfield working group has brought together City Administration, City residents, planning agencies, and Federal and State regulators. Every two years the working group reviews and revises the Brownfields Redevelopment Strategic Plan with its Priority List, updates the maps and narrative, adds sites, and determine which sites require marketing. The CCI's Land & Brownfield working group then develops one page marketing sheets for each site that is determined to require marketing and link them to the City's and CRA's webpages.

    Brownfields Marketing

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The primary means by which the CRA markets major Brownfield sites is through the publicly advertised Request for Proposal (RFP) process. By this process the CRA is able to consistently state its desired outcome based on sound planning principles and established community goals. In addition the RFP process allows the CRA to evaluate competing proposals on a “level playing field” and determine which proposal best answers the reuse objectives of the CRA’s stakeholders. During 2015, the CRA solicited proposals for the approximately 5 acre Borden Chemical Site on Federal Street and successfully negotiated an agreement of sale which calls for the development of a $25.0 million high-tech manufacturing facility http://www.camdencollaborative.com/land--brownfields.html The CRA refrains from utilizing the State's Site Mart site due to difficulties and lack of results. The CRA rather markets the City's brownfield sites through the CRA's webpage. The webpage compiles a list of the City's contaminated sites in one location for future buyers and developers to easily access.

  • Community Partnership & Outreach

    Community Education and Outreach

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City of Camden is tackling its extreme urban water infrastructure challenges through an innovation and dynamic partnership called the Camden SMART (Stormwater Management And Resource Training) Initiative. Founded in 2011 by a coalition of six entities - Cooper’s Ferry Partnership (CFP), the City of Camden (City), Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA), Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program (RCE), New Jersey Tree Foundation (NJTF), and the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP)- the Camden SMART Initiative is a community-driven movement to protect human health, improve conditions for economic development, improve water quality, and enhance the quality of life for Camden City, its residents, and the Delaware River watershed through the broad use of green and grey infrastructure techniques for stormwater management. As a result of Camden’s aging and overtaxed combined sewer system, a one-inch rainstorm can leave major roads impassable, turn parking lots into stagnant lakes, and send sewage into parks, homes, and waterways. Not only is this a nuisance, it is a public health crisis that degrades the quality of life of Camden’s residents and negatively impacts the City’s economic viability and environmental quality. In an attempt to spread the word on the activities of the Camden SMART Initiative, the SMART Team hosts an annual Camden SMART Forum. This year’s Forum was hosted on April 20, 2016 in Camden, NJ. The event attracted a superb turnout with more than 140 participants representing more than 60 organizations and 13 exciting exhibits that illuminated the plethora of sustainability initiatives underway in and around the City of Camden. The Forum featured a several exciting speakers, including Camden Mayor Dana L. Redd, and Mark Biedron, Co-Found of The Willows School, as well as information pertaining to completed and upcoming projects. For those residents that were unable to attend the Forum, SMART Partners hosted the Green and Complete Streets meeting on Tuesday, April 26th, 2016 to discuss local green infrastructure opportunities and provide Camden SMART Initiative updates.

    Create Green Team

    10 Points Bronze Mandatory

    Program Summary:

    Founded in late 2009, the Camden Green Team helped the City of Camden achieve Sustainable Jersey Bronze Certification in September 2012. Building on that achievement, the Camden Green Team achieved Silver Certification in 2013 and is hoping for re-certification at the Silver Level in 2016. The Camden Green Team consists of an ever-expanding group of stakeholders from numerous organizations. The overarching goal of the Camden Green Team is to improve the quality of life of Camden residents by implementing initiatives aimed at making the City more sustainable. Attached you'll find the original resolution creating the Green Team in 2009, our 2016 accomplishments and work plan and a letter of continued support of the Green Team from Mayor Dana Redd of Camden from May 2016.

  • Green Fairs

    "Green" Your Green Fair

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Camden City, in partnership with Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, hosted the Camden Jam on September 19, 2015. The Jam was held outdoors during the day to eliminate the use of excessive artificial lighting. Recycling bins and trashcans were strategically placed throughout the event to encourage the use of sustainable practices with regards to waste reduction. Camden City has a mandatory single-stream recycling program, and recycling containers were on-site during the event. The Camden Jam featured a variety of local vendors that provided guests with food, beverages, reading material, and additional goods for a fee. Goods packaging was recyclable. In addition to local vendors, the Jam featured local environmentalists that provided hands-on activities and demonstrations that relate to issues present within the region such as managing stormwater runoff or adopting alternatives to reduce plastic consumption. Additionally, the Jam was hosted at Roosevelt Plaza park, a space that is easily accessible from PATCO, RiverLine, NJ Transit, and the RiverLink Ferry. To encourage the use of public transportation, parking was not made readily available.

    Hold a Green Fair

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    On September 19, 2015 members of the Green Team, in collaboration with the City of Camden, hosted the 2015 Camden Jam at Roosevelt Plaza Park in Camden, NJ. The Camden Jam featured an EcoZone that highlighted sustainable practices by providing a variety of hands-on activities and demonstrations for visitors of all ages. Eight of Camden Collaborative Initiative’s (CCI) partners participated in the EcoZone: AmeriCorps New Jersey Watershed Ambassadors, Camden SMART Team, Camden County Office of Sustainability, Fairmont Water Works, New Jersey Audubon, Rutgers Center for the Arts, Sustainable Cherry Hill, and Sustainable Haddon Heights. Partners provided EcoZone visitors with demonstrations ranging from point and non-point source pollution explanations to a handcrafted plastic-bag monster costume containing over 500 plastic bags, the number of plastic bags Sustainable Haddon Heights claims one American consumes every year. EcoZone visitors were able to actively participate in a sun catcher craft event to engage children while also signing up for one of Camden SMART’s Build-A-Rain-Barrel-Workshops to assist in the reduction of stormwater runoff within the City of Camden. The EcoZone provided visitors with activities to engage all ages, educations, and interests.

  • Diversity & Equity

    Environmental Justice in Planning & Zoning

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    On February 10, 2015, with the unanimous approval of the City of Camden City Council, a Sustainability Ordinance was adopted as a key revision to Sections of their existing Land Development Ordinance. The Sustainability Ordinance promotes: 1. environmentally-related sustainable practices; 2. economic growth within the City in a manner that is protective of the public health, safety and welfare of the residents; and 3. development of vibrant neighborhoods that balance the needs of the built environment with that of natural environmental habitats and ecosystems. Importantly, this ordinance demonstrates a model for restoration as a key element for the regeneration of a Post-Industrial city while promoting development that improves the City of Camden’s overall quality of life and triple bottom line: Economy, Community and the Environment.

  • Municipal Energy Audits and Upgrades

    Inventory and Upgrade All Buildings

    50 Points Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary:

    In the spring of 2012, the City of Camden completed its Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (EECS) document (attached), which is a roadmap toward dramatically reducing municipal energy consumption and costs over the next ten years. The document identifies immediate, short-term and long-term energy reduction activities both City-wide and for City of Camden facilities specifically. The document reflects the stated goals of State of New Jersey’s 2008 Energy Master Plan. The EECS and four of the recommended immediate-term improvements were funded by the Federal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG). The EECBG, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, represents a Presidential priority to deploy the cheapest, cleanest, and most reliable energy technologies available throughout the country. As a first step toward the implementation of the EECS document, an energy audit and upgrades, including the installation of a high-efficiency HVAC system, at the North Camden Community Center, a municipally-owned facility. Additionally, the City of Camden intends to perform energy audits of and upgrades to all qualifying municipal buildings in the immediate future, utilizing the NJ Clean Energy Program. To spearhead this process, the City has created an inventory of all municipal buildings and drafted a request for proposals (attached) for audit firms to perform energy audits on qualified facilities in connection with the NJ Board of Public Utilities’ Local Government Energy Audit Program. The City has submitted the draft to TRC, the NJ Clean Energy Program contractor, for approval. Following approval, the City intends to immediately issue the RFP for audits. Additionally, the Camden City Council passed a resolution in 2010 authorizing an agreement with PSE&G to audit qualifying municipal buildings for the Direct Install Program (attached) and is currently pursuing that avenue as well.

  • Municipal Energy Initiatives

    Municipal On-Site Solar System

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Camden City wastewater treatment plant was built in 1954 in the City of Camden. The City’s sewer collection system drains directly into the plant. In 1978, the CCMUA purchases the plant from Camden City and afterward expanded it to also accept flow from the suburban municipalities in Camden County. However, since 1954, the plant has been the Camden City sewage treatment plant. In a continuing effort to reduce energy costs and make the CCMUA greener, the Authority has entered into a contract for the design, installation, ownership, operation and maintenance of solar panels at the CCMUA’s sewage treatment plant in Camden City. The Authority has also signed a 15 year power purchase agreement with the contractor, Heliosage, which means that the CCMUA will not be responsible for capital costs or ongoing maintenance costs. Rather, the Authority will simply begin paying a monthly solar power bill at rates well below prevailing utility rates. The solar panels are located on top of the treatment plant’s primary and final sedimentation tanks. It is projected that the solar panels will generate about 2 million watts (2kW) of electricity, which represents approximately 10% of the plant’s energy needs. The projected savings are approximately $300,000 in energy costs during the first year of the project and about $7 million over the life of the 15 year power purchase agreement This solar panel project is the first phase of the CCMUA’s overall green energy initiative. Ultimately, the CCMUA’s goal is to use 100% green energy within the next five years.

  • Transportation Initiatives

    Public Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure

    15 Points

    Program Summary:

    In 2013, Camden County took the lead to install 11 plug-in Level 2 electric vehicle charging stations throughout the County. We worked with our municipal partners are the logistics of installation, including permitting and site work. Two of the stations were installed in a parking garage in the City of Camden and have been in continuous use since their installation.

  • Support Local Food

    Farmers Markets

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Greensgrow Farm Mobile Markets, in partnership with the City of Camden, provide residents of low-income neighborhoods of Camden City the opportunity to purchase locally-grown, and affordable produce each week from May to November. Many of these neighborhoods have limited access to fresh and healthy food. Neighbors in these urban neighborhoods benefit from increased healthy food choices and family farmers from the rural area of New Jersey benefit from increased sales of their products. The Greensgrow Farm Mobile Markets accepts EBT/ Food Stamp benefits and offers a Double Value Coupon program to increase the amount of fresh local food low-income families and individuals can buy by matching all purchases made with EBT cards dollar for dollar. Greensgrow Farm operates two mobile market trucks that visit 5 neighborhood locations on Thursday and Friday of each week during the market season. The markets last for 3-5 hours and take place in the late morning or late afternoon. The mobile markets cost about $2,000 a week to operate and earn just enough income from the sales of fresh produce and other farm-fresh products to break even. The City of Camden has provided invaluable support for the Greensgrow Markets through promotions and appearances at the markets by Mayor Dana Redd. The City of Camden has also contributed by facilitating the licensing process for the Greensgrow market trucks and providing the certifications free of charge. Mayor Dana Redd and her staff have worked tirelessly to improve the fortunes of Camden City and see the Greensgrow Markets as an opportunity improve the quality of life for thousands of residents and promote economic development in low-income areas. This is why Mayor Redd has never missed an opportunity to speak to community groups and faith-based organizations about the importance of eating healthy and shopping at the Greensgrow Neighborhood Markets. Additionally, for the last twelve years, the Camden Area Health Education Center, Inc. (AHEC) has operated four farmers markets throughout the City of Camden. The markets not only provide Jersey grown produce but also cooking demonstrations, nutrition consultations, health screenings and health promotion. The market season is mid-June to late October. The markets serve over 8,000 customers annually. Over 30 organizations, churches and agencies partner with Camden AHEC to plan the markets every season. In 2013, Camden added yet another Farmer's Market to the fresh local food movement in the City. This market was heavily supported by the City of Camden and is run by the Camden Children's Garden. The Children's Garden mobile market has at least three stops per week at low-income housing units, senior centers and other key locations around the City. This mobile market also accepts SNAP/EBT.

    Making Farmers Markets Accessible

    5 Points

    Program Summary:

    At the foot of Jasper Street in Waterfront South, there is a beautiful city park. In the park, CFET manages a garden that serves as the source of most of the produce we grow each year. The tomatoes, hot and sweet peppers, eggplants, tomatillos, husk cherries, potatoes, salad greens, bush and dry beans, collards, broccoli, cabbage, onions, garlic, okra, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, blueberries, etc. can be found for sale at our weekly youth-run farmers’ market. Center for Environmental Transformation's (CFET) Farmer's Market is easily accessible via public transportation and by foot. CFET's Farmers Markets in Camden accept SNAP/Food Stamps

  • Health & Wellness

    Building Healthier Communities

    20 Points

    Program Summary:

    Get Healthy Camden (GHC) is a collaboration creating sustainable and equitable change for a healthier Camden and operates as the seventh workgroup of the Camden Collaborative Initiative (CCI)—a solutions-oriented partnership between governmental, non-profit, private, and community-based agencies formed to plan and implement innovative strategies to improve the environment and the quality of life of Camden’s residents. This past year, GHC was selected to lead for the Camden Promise Zone health workgroup which is leading the efforts to increase physical activity and increase food access. Due to this partnership, City Council approved a citywide wellness resolution that states health will be included in all policy changes moving forward, particularly within built environment, food access and workplace wellness within the municipal government. GHC will provide guidance and recommendations to the local board of health, once established, to enforce the resolution. This summer, GHC conducted two bike audits with stakeholders and residents to assess conditions of the roads for bike riding on the North and south sides of the city. Participants were asked to document the physical conditions of the roads, lighting, ensure proper signs were visible and traffic was conducive for biking. Recommendations were complied during a debrief and will be included in the Camden City Design Guidelines. GHC and Mastery School of East Camden established a School Wellness Team consisting of staff, parents, its food service provider and community partners to make Mastery School a model for health. An action plan has been developed for implementation and enforcement of a school wellness policy for all 3 Mastery Schools in Camden. GHC supported Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers’ (CCHP) Faith & Health Forum which bought 150 members of the faith-based community together to discuss how the faith-based organizations can play a vital role in transforming the community’s health.

    Smoke-Free and Tobacco-Free Public Places

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City of Camden has passed an ordinance to ban smoking and tobacco use in city-owned playgrounds and parks. The ordinance has been implemented to ensure exposures to second-hand smoke do not occur in places of public play and recreation.

  • Innovation & Demonstration Projects

    Innovative Community Project 1

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    On Tuesday, October 6th, 2015 the City of Camden and Cooper’s Ferry Partnership completed one of its most complex and rewarding projects to date—the Von Nieda Park Stormwater Management & Park Improvement Project. Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, in partnership with the City of Camden, Camden County, and the Cramer Hill Community Development Corporation, has been working on this stormwater management project in the Cramer Hill neighborhood that is a direct result of the Cramer Hill NOW! Neighborhood Plan, completed by Cooper’s Ferry Partnership and the Cramer Hill Community Development Corporation in 2008, which identified neighborhood flooding as the #1 concern reported by Cramer Hill residents. The Von Nieda Park Stormwater Management & Park Improvement Project will mitigate flooding in the Cramer Hill neighborhood, specifically the Von Nieda Park and surrounding residential properties. The historic Baldwin’s Run tributary stream originally ran through Von Nieda Park, but was filled in the 1950’s establishing the topography that frequently floods the neighborhood. There are two construction projects that comprise the overarching flood mitigation strategy: 1) The Von Nieda Park Stormwater Management Project entails the separation and improvements to the storm and sanitary pipe infrastructure in and around the park. Construction of the first phase of thee improvements began in July 2014 and were completed in October 2015 after delays due to weather and the presences of contaminated soil. The $2.8 million project, was funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) Green Acres and Recreational Trails Programs, the Neighborhood Revitalization Tax Credit Program via the Cramer Hill CDC, and NJDEP Environmental Infrastructure Trust (NJEIT) via the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA). 2) The Baldwin’s Run Urban Daylighting Project entails the, re-establishing a section of the Baldwin’s Run tributary that once ran to the river from this location. Re-establishing the stream and enhancing wetlands in this area of the city will benefit the natural habitat for the endangered plant and animal species in the area. Full scope of the project included the daylighting of the stream, wetlands restoration, and the construction of a multi-use trail connecting into Von Nieda Park and the surrounding neighborhoods. Construction was completed in December 2014. Funding for the Baldwin’s Run daylighting project is from a low-interest loan from the NJDEP Environmental Infrastructure Trust for $1.5. Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority, in partnership with Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, submitted this funding application. Additionally, Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, in partnership with the City of Camden, was awarded a $24,000 grant for the construction of the trail from NJDEP’s Recreational Tails Program.

    Innovative Community Project 2

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Since our initial submission for this program, the City of Camden has developed a BikeShare program where people can rent bikes for a period of time and then return them to location from which they borrowed them. The bikes are donated to the County and volunteers work to refurbish and repair the bikes for the program. So far, almost 1,000 bikes have been donated. Camden has developed several programs to promote the use of bicycles in the City. With support from the Rails to Trails Conservancy and grant funding from the William Penn Foundation and Campbell’s Soup Company, Camden residents have developed ‘pop-up bike shops’ throughout the City to engage people in how to repair bicycles as well as safely ride them in an urban setting. The bike workshops are free and open to the public. The program also involves running a three-week bicycle course for kids. The 30 students enrolled in the program call themselves CYCLE (Camden youth Cycling, Learning and Exercising). For $95, each child gets to keep a refurbished bike, helmet and jersey, and will ride from Camden to Trenton at the end of the workshop. City Council has been heavily involved in this program. The first official bike lane in the City was just completed on MLK, Jr. Boulevard. Two other streets, Pine and Pearl, have been identified for re-striping to include bike lanes. Funding for this project was acquired through the TIGER grant program overseen by the US Department of Transportation. Camden has also been working with the Delaware River Port Authority to fund the design of a new bicycle ramp for the Ben Franklin Bridge, which links Camden to Downtown Philadelphia. This bridge has pedestrian access, but no easy way to get a bicycle across on the Camden side.

    Innovative Community Project 3

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    On January 24, 2013, the City of Camden, with the support of Cooper's Ferry Partnership, Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency, launched the Camden Collaborative Initiative. The Collaborative is building upon the success of environmental initiatives underway, made possible by the efforts and resources of multiple partners that have come together to address the complex environmental issues present in the City. The Camden Collaborative Initiative was formed to realize the many opportunities to maintain, restore, and enhance the environmental resources in the city. The Collaborative will facilitate and leverage partnerships for proactive, holistic, and innovative solutions to help Camden become a vibrant sustainable city. The Camden Collaborative Initiative is a solutions-oriented partnership between governmental, non-profit, private, and community-based agencies formed to plan and implement innovative strategies to improve the environment and the quality of life of Camden's residents. The Camden Collaborative Initiative focuses on seven environmental factors: Air, Camden SMART (Stormwater Management and Resource Training) Initiative, Environmental Education, Green Team, Land & Brownfields, Get Healthy Camden, and Waste & Recycling. To date, the Camden Collaborative Initiative has over 40 partnerships, has completed over 60 projects environmentally related, and has engaged over 5,000 residents.

    Raingardens

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The objective of the Camden SMART (Stormwater Management and Resource Training) Initiative is to develop a comprehensive network of green infrastructure programs and projects for the City of Camden. The Initiative is a collaboration between the City of Camden, Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority, Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program, New Jersey Tree Foundation, NJ Department of Environmental Protection, our public-private partners, community organizations, and most importantly, Camden residents to restore and revitalize our neighborhoods. The Initiative includes neighborhood green infrastructure projects, stormwater management policy development, and green infrastructure training programs. To date, Camden SMART has installed 17 rain gardens throughout the City. These rain gardens have diverted over 1.5 million gallons of stormwater from going into the combined stormwater system. Here are three examples: Farnham Park is the largest park in the City of Camden, comprising 71-acres. The upper portion of the park has recently completed extensive redevelopment. The project consisted of three main components: stormwater improvements, upgrading the storm pipe system and installing a rain garden on site, connecting to the Camden GreenWay system via the installation of a multi-purpose trail throughout the park and improvements to the spray pool/recreational equipment for the residents. Farnham Park celebrated its reopening on July 20 and unveiled its SMART improvements, new recreation amenities, and a connection to the Camden GreenWay trail. The $1 Million revitalization project was funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the NJDEP Green Acres Program, NJDEP Recreational Trails Program, the Camden County Open Space Trust, and the Trust for Public Land. Project Partners include the City of Camden, Cooper's Ferry Partnership, and Parkside Business and Community in Partnership. The Waterfront South rain gardens were built on the site of an abandoned gas station that was demolished and remediated with the help of the New Jersey DEP. The park consists of four rain gardens connected by walking paths that have been designed by the Rutgers Agricultural Extension Service. The landscaping, including grading and plants selected, are not just beautiful, but functional in capturing stormwater and prevent it from entering Camden’s combined sewer system. The Ferry Avenue rain garden project, located on a vacant lot owned by the CCMUA adjacent to its Administration Building, is approximately 800-900 square feet. Two curb cut inlet channels capture, filter, and infiltrate stormwater from the surrounding roadways. The project is located near a low-lying intersection which frequently floods during storm events. The installation of this project was part of a two-day training workshop on rain gardens for landscape professionals. This project included a tree and shrub planting organized by New Jersey Tree Foundation.

  • Land Use & Transportation

    Bicycle and Pedestrian Audits

    5 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City of Camden has begun advocating and implementing elements that promote healthy lifestyles including the construction of bike lanes and sharrows. Through Cooper's Ferry Partnership, bike advocates from across the region assisted in performing a bike audit in several of Camden's neighborhoods to understand biking limitations and advantages in the City of Camden. Partners biked through four distinct neighborhoods: Waterfront South, North Camden, Fairview, and East Camden to assess the biking feasibility in these neighborhoods. The trail through North and East Camden consisted of 12 miles of both on and off road bicycling opportunities. The opportunities and constraints have been identified in the attached documents through a variety of videos, pictures, and written documentation. The collected information will be used for consideration in future planning to address these sections and construct additional segments.

    Complete Streets Program

    20 Points

    Program Summary:

    A Complete Streets Resolution was passed at Camden's City Council meeting on Tuesday, June 11th. The signed and dated copy is attached.

    Sustainable Land Use Pledge

    10 Points Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary:

    On April 10, 2012, Camden City Council adopted a Sustainable Land Use Pledge by resolution. The adopted pledge reflected all of the elements required by Sustainable Jersey. Subsequent to its adoption, the pledge was disseminated to the City Planning Board and Zoning Board as well as the Department of Planning and Development. The resolution was redistributed to these groups on May 23, 2016. Documentation of the email that was sent is attached, as well as the original resolution.

  • Local Economies

    Green Jobs/Economic Development

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Camden Collaborative Initiative (CCI) was created in 2013 in an effort to address six environmental issues facing the City of Camden including environmental education, as well as brownfield sites, flooding, air quality, recycling and environmental justice. The Environmental Education Working Group of the CCI combines a group of educational, non-profit and governmental entities together to offer environmental educational experiences and information to the students of Camden City’s schools. In its first year the working group has created a Needs Assessment, an Environmental Education Resource List and the Camden City’s Green Intern Program. Camden City’s Green Intern Program is a five week curriculum focused on the environment, education and employment. Each day the interns visit a different collaborative partner in an effort to expose the students to the various environmental issues facing Camden City. The program is centered on exposing youth to three core issues; the environment, education and employment. Each day for five weeks, the Green Ambassadors, report to the CCMUA and begin their morning routine. In addition to the preparing for the programming for that day, the Green Ambassadors are responsible for journaling about the previous day’s activities. These journal entries are used to create a “Presentation of Learning” which will be presented to the CCI partners at the close of the program. While the “Presentation of Learning” is clearly an educational component of the program it also lends to the employment component as the interns are responsible for producing a “deliverable”. In addition, the City of Camden launched POWER Corps in 2016 - another green jobs program open exclusively to youth in the City of Camden. Details on that program are included in the Qualitative Assessment.

  • Buy Local Programs

    Support Local Businesses

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    On April 28, 2015, Camden, New Jersey was designated as a Promise Zone by the Obama Administration. The initiative forms a partnership between the federal government and local leaders of these designated communities, in which they work together to increase economic activity, leverage private investments, improve educational opportunities, address public health issues, and reduce/prevent violence and crime. Lead by the Mayor’s Office and Center For Family Services, Camden Promise Zone will bring together several local organizations and partnerships, as the city implements solutions that will allow Camden to continue to revitalize.

  • Natural Resources

    Water Conservation Education Program

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Camden SMART Team serves as the organizing entity to facilitate the implementation of the Camden SMART (Stormwater Management and Resource Training) Initiative. The Camden SMART Team is a coordinating group comprised of the City of Camden, Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority, Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program, New Jersey Tree Foundation and the NJ Department of Environmental Protection. Under the leadership of Mayor Redd, the City of Camden is deeply committed to the implementation of the Camden SMART Initiative. Strengthening communities and revitalizing neighborhoods in the City of Camden includes not only economic sustainability, but also environmental sustainability. Effectively managing stormwater in the City of Camden not only will help prevent neighborhood flooding and combined sewer overflows, but can also tackle other issues such as air pollution, recreational needs and neighborhood beautification. The City of Camden is dedicated to educating residents and community leaders about the benefits of stormwater management and green infrastructure through neighborhood projects, training programs, and the incorporation of stormwater management into city policies. During the summer of 2016, Camden SMART Partners directly engaged with over 150 Camden youth through the Salvation Army Kroc Center – Camden Summer Camp Aquatic Sciences Program. SMART Partners provided stormwater management and water conservation education through the utilization of the Sewer In A Suitcase demonstration project along with a PowerPoint presentation. Students were provided with specific ways to minimize water consumption such as turning the water faucet off when brushing teeth or reducing showering time. Students were informed about green infrastructure techniques such as rain gardens, rain barrels, and green roofs. To conclude the presentation students were provided with the 7 Ways to Conserve Water and with information pertaining to Build-A-Rain-Barrel-Workshops.

    Water Conservation Ordinance

    20 Points Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary:

    After the required two readings, Camden City Council approved a water conservation ordinance (drafted by the Camden City Green Team based on the template provided by Sustainable Jersey) at the September 11, 2012 meeting. Copies of the executed ordinance are not yet available, but we have attached the September 11 Council agenda and the copy of the ordinance that was attached to the agenda. The Camden Green Team and Camden SMART (Stormwater Management and Resource Training) Initiative are very active and engaged in the community, and are dedicated to supporting the enforcement of this ordinance by working closely with City officials and communicating regularly with City residents. Additionally, in the coming weeks, the City administration will be informing relevant staff of the ordinance through memos and department meetings. Lastly, in partnership with the City of Camden, we have prepared several documents to spread the word about the water conservation ordinance. An article has been published in a City newsletter (attached) and a one-page flyer will also be distributed in the next quarterly bill sent by the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority later this year (attached).

  • Tree & Woodlands Management

    Community Forestry Management Plan and NJUCF Accreditation

    20 Points

    Program Summary:

    Camden is awaiting approval to implement the Community Forestry Management Plan spanning from 2016-2020. Each year, the City of Camden and the Shade Tree Advisory Board work to implement the goals of our plan. Camden's Community Forestry Management Plan for 2016-2020 has been sent to the NJDEP for placement on the the Shade Tree Federation Council's November agenda. During the November meeting, the Plan is expected to be approved. The Shade Tree Federation Council allows municipalities to back-date one year which is why the City's report and efforts have a start date of 2016. The NJDEP confirms that the Plan is on tract to be approved by the end of 2016. Mayor Redd has signed the Community Forestry Management Plan for 2016-2020. Because the Plan will not be approved until end of November 2016 and formally implemented in January 2017 (informal implementation began in January 2016), the City of Camden does not have the "End-Year or Mid-Year Status Report Letter" provided by the NJDEP. Camden expects the Status Report Letter to be issued during the 2017 year and commits to providing Sustainable Jersey with a copy once it has been issued. The City of Camden is continuing to work on our Tree Canopy Goal of 25% set in 2012. To date, the City has achieved 18% tree canopy goal which is why the goal has remained at 25%. The Shade Tree Commission anticipates achieving the goal of 25% tree canopy coverage during the 2016-2020 Community Forestry Management Plan years. To date, the City of Camden has earned 72 CEU's in 2016.

  • Waste Management

    Prescription Drug Safety and Disposal

    10 Points Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary:

    The City of Camden has two safe and convenient locations for disposing of prescription drugs. No longer needed or outdated prescription drugs in homes are the same drugs that have unfortunately become the target of theft and misuse, oftentimes by people who have access to the residence. Residents can stop by the Police Headquarters on Federal Street or the Prosecutor's Office on 5th Street at any time to dispose of their prescription drugs in a secure container anonymously and with no questions asked. Flyers listing all of the municipal prescription drop off locations around the County are listed below, in English and in Spanish. This information is also posted, along with other municipal locations throughout Camden County, on the following website: http://addictions.camdencounty.com/resources/rx-drop-off/

  • Recycling

    Community Paper Shredding Day

    5 Points

    Program Summary:

    As a component of Mayor Dana L. Redd’s annual Camden Clean Campaign, the City of Camden will host three paper-shredding events in 2016. The purpose of the yearly initiative to beautify City neighborhoods, promote sustainable practices such as recycling and not littering, and empower residents to take responsibility for and feel pride in their City. For the purpose of the Camden Clean Campaign, the City was divided into eight zones, encompassing all of the City’s neighborhoods, and a clean-up day scheduled for each zone. On each of the clean-up days, City staff, including Mayor Redd, residents, and volunteers participate in cleaning their neighborhoods. In 2016, the Campaign extended from May 2 to August 1. Three of the clean-up days were coupled with shredding events. The shredder events occurred at public parks and community centers on the following dates: April 16, July 30, July 25 and November 12. At the shredder events, residents could learn about the City’s recycling program and obtain a recycling bin free of charge. In addition, residents could also dispose of used electronic devices. The shredder events were promoted through fliers, emailed press advisories, the City’s website and social media.