Sustainable Jersey Community Certification Report

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This is the Sustainable Jersey Certification Report of Trenton City (Mercer), a Sustainable Jersey silver certified applicant.

Trenton City (Mercer) was certified on October 10, 2015 with 365 points. Listed below is information regarding Trenton City (Mercer)’s Sustainable Jersey efforts and materials associated with the applicant’s certified actions.

Contact Information

The designated Sustainable Jersey contact for Trenton City (Mercer) is:

Name:Stephani Register
Title/Position:Senior Planner / Housing & Economic Development
Address:319 E. State Street Trenton NJ
Trenton, NJ 08608
Phone:609-989-3507

Sustainability Actions Implemented

Each approved action and supporting documentation for which Trenton City (Mercer) was approved for in 2015 appears below. Note: Standards for the actions below may have changed and the documentation listed may no longer satisfy requirements for that action. Additionally, points associated with actions prior to 2013 certifications may not be accurate.

  • Brownfields

    Brownfields Inventory & Prioritization

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Trenton’s Brownfields Program celebrates its 20th year in existence and is one of the most accomplished and sustainable municipal brownfields programs in the United States. The Program has obtained over $30 million in grants, and received six prestigious, national Phoenix Awards for brownfields redevelopment. We are proud to adapt our program’s metrics and data to the format established by Sustainable Jersey. The City created a Brownfields Inventory using the following resources: • The existing Brownfields Program’s inventory, as well as other city inventories. The other city inventories contained sites that are owned and managed by the city, as well as additional sites; • Environmental database reports prepared for brownfields sites for assessment purposes; • NJDEP’s Data Miner (this resource was culled from over 2,000 entries to less than 150 known contaminated sites in Trenton. Some of these sites are not in need of redevelopment). The data from the Data Miner was imported into a spreadsheet, culled of sites not known to be contaminated, not in need of redevelopment and not located in Trenton, for submittal. Priority sites from Data Miner were included in the Brownfields Inventory and Brownfield Priorities list. The City of Trenton created a Brownfields Priority list using the following variables: • Human and/or ecological hazard (combined weight = 5) • Development potential (3) • Blight reduction potential (3) • Ownership (1) The sites on the Inventory were mapped in GIS using block and lot.

    Brownfields Marketing

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Narrative Summary The City’s Brownfields Program is celebrating its 20th year working to assess, investigate, remediate, market and redevelop brownfields sites in the City of Trenton. During that time period, the City has redeveloped over 50 brownfields sites as reported in the “Metrics” section, and Brownfields Inventory, of the City’s Brownfields Action Plan (http://www.trentonnj.org/Documents/BEST_Action_Plan_6-20-14.pdf). As part of the Brownfields Program’s mission, we have regularly marketed sites for redevelopment and revitalization. Efforts to market brownfields sites over time have included: • Participation in local, state and National brownfields marketing and deal flow events such as: NJ League of Municipalities; other events sponsored by NJDEP, NJEDA and other state organizations; the National Brownfields Conference; the National Brownfields Association; and the U.S. Economic Development Administration; • Development of site-specific marketing materials; • The City of Trenton’s Department of Housing & Economic Development issues requests for proposals for priority brownfields sites located in designated Redevelopment Areas and has sold other brownfields sites through public auction in accordance with state statutes, and through negotiated sales to developers; • The City of Trenton was the first municipality to list sites on NJ Site Mart. NJ Site Mart now includes 153 sites located in Trenton; • The City of Trenton lists selected brownfields sites on the “Choose NJ” website; • The City of Trenton has sites listed on the USEPA’s interactive brownfields map. The new priority site list will allow for renewed focus of marketing efforts on priority sites for which no developer has been designated and for which developers are needed. Renewed efforts will include: • Regular updates to Site Mart, including: updated site data; updating site status; removal of redeveloped sites; and improving visual and other materials; • Development of new, site-specific marketing materials in conjunction with the Division of Economic Development; • Continuation of existing marketing efforts.

    Brownfields Reuse Planning

    15 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City’s Brownfields Program works with the City’s Division of Planning and other units of government to support the reuse of brownfields sites. Brownfields reuse planning tools include: • Using New Jersey’s Redevelopment Law to establish 42 Redevelopment Areas. Each area includes development standards, design standards and other development parameters. These areas are all considered “in need of redevelopment” and each redevelopment area is established by Ordinance by the City Council with substantial public outreach and input. Eight of the 13 designated “priority” brownfields sites are located within established Redevelopment Areas; • Establishing two “Brownfield Development Areas” (BDAs) within the City. The BDAs allow for area-wide planning activities and elevate the prioritization of State Hazardous Discharge Site Remediation Funds for investigation and cleanup. Six of the thirteen priority brownfields sites are located in BDAs: five in the Assunpink Greenway BDA; and one in the Magic Marker BDA. • Three of the 13 priority sites are located in established Historic Districts and require preservation as part of redevelopment. Only two of the thirteen priority brownfields sites are not located within the above-referenced planning areas. These two sites will utilize site-specific planning tools (for example, the Vacant and Abandoned Properties Act). Brownfields is also included as an element in the City’s new Master Plan, designated as “Trenton 250” (see http://trenton250.org/ ). With respect to Sustainable Jersey compliance for Brownfields Reuse Planning, the following actions were taken: • Designate the top 13 prioritized sites for additional information, review and marketing; • Tabulate and upload data in accordance with SJ recommendations, including: stakeholders; site description, zoning, redevelopment designations, development status, accessibility to public and other transportation, reuse options, etc; • Upload Ordinances designating Redevelopment Areas and the City’s Master Plan. • Upload information regarding the City’s two BDA’s (data sheets and reports) Throughout the process used to determine the reuses of brownfields in Trenton--city council discussions and resolutions, Trenton250 public meetings, Master Plan discussions--the public has been closely involved and had opportunities to provide input and offer recommendations at regularly scheduled and specially called meetings. UPDATE: The City of Trenton BEST Advisory Committee (Better Environmental Solutions for Trenton) adopted a Brownfields Program Action Plan in June 2014 (see upload). The Action Plan serves as a blueprint for action to maintain a successful, sustainable Brownfields Program, by setting forth program components and associated metrics. Also, please note the Brownfields Inventory & Prioritization does not expire until July 2016 (and so this is not a resubmittal and the 6.5 years does not apply. In any event, the Enterprise Ave Redevelopment Plan is dated June 2009, within the timeframe). The City of Trenton is not relying upon a Brownfields Element for this submission. Rather, we are relying upon the submission of redevelopment plans (which do not expire), ordinances (also still valid), and the June 2014 BEST Action Plan. Nevertheless, to give you a sense of the active ongoing planning that is taking place around Trenton's Brownfields Program, the draft Trenton 250 Brownfields Element has been attached.

  • Community Partnership & Outreach

    Create Green Team

    10 Points Bronze Mandatory

    Program Summary:

    The City of Trenton formally established its Green Team in October 2011 with a resolution from City Council (see SJ Trenton Green Team Resolution 2011). Monthly meetings have been held in City Hall, generally on the third Thursday of each month, with community participation and collaboration since May of 2011. A current list of Green Team members is included (Green Team Members 2015). The Trenton Green Team has actively supported the City's efforts to undertake a comprehensive Master Plan process and in 2014 testified in favor of pursuing a more comprehensive sustainable Master Planning process, which is now underway. In November 2014, City Council adopted a resolution renewing support for the Trenton Green Team and supporting the City's application for 2015 Silver Certification. A summary of the Trenton Green Team's activities is included.

    Education for Sustainability Programs

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Fernbrook Farms Environmental Education Center’s Unit of Study program offers comprehensive, cross-curricular education on the subjects of nature, the environment, and the sources of our food. We deliver programming correlated with NJ State Standards that engages students in hands-on, interactive lessons. Beyond the average field trip, this program includes two introductory lessons that take place in each classroom before the trip as well as an after-trip visit to help students reflect on what they have learned during their experience and draw connections to their local outdoor spaces. The Farm Unit of Study explores the origins of our food and its destinations. This helps students understand that food, regardless of what it looks like when it makes it to their dinner table, ultimately comes from a farm. The field trip to Fernbrook Farms Environmental Education Center allows students to see a real-life farm in action. Fernbrook is a 230-acre historic farm property that is now home to an 18-acre organic vegetable farm and several farm animals. Students rotate through a series of “Investigation Stations” that allow them to interact with several components of our farm. Each station (soil/compost, vegetable farm, animal barn, tractor ride) is led by an experienced Fernbrook Educator. The final visit from Fernbrook Educators includes a recap and reflection on the activities the students experienced during the program. We also strive to bring the farm experience home by facilitating a planting in the school’s garden. The Trenton Green Team used a Sustainable Jersey small grant to support this education program. Students from Trenton's Washington Elementary School, Mott School, and Hedgepeth-Williams Middle School participated in the program.

  • Green Fairs

    Hold a Green Fair

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Living Local EXPO 2015. Trenton Green Team worked in partnership with the green teams from Lawrence, Ewing, Hopewell, Princeton, and the Mercer County Office of Sustainable Development, to organize the eighth annual Living Local EXPO, which took place on Saturday, March 28 from 11-4 at the NJ National Guard Armory in Lawrence NJ. This year, the Trenton Green Team participated actively in planning the event, attending weekly planning meetings and contributing resources and ideas as well as marketing the event through emails and social media. The EXPO was started as a venue to showcase local green resources in the area and a place to hold short educational seminars for people interested in changing their lifestyles to become more sustainable. In the past eight years, the event has grown exponentially, to include energy efficiency NJ Clean Energy incentives, installers, and providers, electric and high efficiency vehicles, local farmers and products, health officials and hospital wellness clinics, and local schools. For the past three years, EXPO organizers have reached out to neighboring municipalities to collaborate in the organizing task force. We now feature over 90 local vendors (including businesses, schools, faith communities and other groups) promoting “green” tracks: home efficiency, community/school gardens, transportation, local farms/products, health and healthy living, and community education. We included hands-on workshops and displays from local businesses and non-profits. We had speakers presented sustainability issues ranging from local birds, “green” insurance, school science projects to the future of transportation to recycling in Mercer County, and more. We had over 1000 attendees. Trenton 250, Trenton Downtown Association, Isles, and other Trenton-based organizations participated in the event. A website showcased this highly successful event: http://www.livinglocalexpo.net/

  • Diversity & Equity

    Lead Education and Outreach Programs

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City of Trenton through the City’s Trenton Health Team has been active in both Lead Education and outreach over the past year, most particularly by means of the partnership between Isles [a major City nonprofit focused on environmental issues] and the City’s Department of Health. Isles focuses primarily on outreach, environmental remediation and the training of rehab contractors and their work force. The City, through their Nurse, Sharon Winn, conducts outreach, education, and follow-ups with parents in coordination with the City clinics and local pediatricians. These efforts are ongoing. The target population is young children at the age appropriate testing milestones, and the Lead Testing of homes in targeted neighborhoods known to have high concentrations of lead. As following through on Lead Testing can be problematic for many inner city parents, the City has encouraged local physicians to acquire testing equipment for their offices. To date, two City clinics and an additional local pediatrician have acquired such equipment. This is a very important step forward as transportation to, and wait times at, commercial labs can be quite challenging for the parents of young children. This physician office service allows the City nurse to concentrate on patients served by physicians not having their own testing equipment. She stays in close contact with such physicians, and tracks families reported to her by them to ensure that the all important Lead Testing is accomplished. RN Winn reaches out to such families by both mail and phone calls, providing education on Lead toxicity issues and helping to coordinate the necessary testing. As stated above, both organizations conduct considerable outreach efforts, and RN Winn is particularly active in reaching out to both families and important stake holders that serve them.

  • Municipal Energy Audits and Upgrades

    Energy Audits for One Building

    20 Points

    Program Summary:

    ENERGY AUDIT ACTIVITIES During 2010 the City of Trenton acquired an Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant [EECBG], which enabled the City to conduct energy audits and develop an Energy Efficient Strategy [EECS] meeting Department of Energy standards. This in turn would enable the City to acquire ARRA monies for renovations and retrofits to City owned properties with the goals of reducing energy consumption and decreasing Green House Gas Emissions. The City contracted M & E Engineers, Inc. and the Spiezle Architectural Group to conduct energy audits and develop an ECCS. This Team conducted Level 1 ASHRAE energy audits on 49 City buildings, approximating 825,728 square feet. The Team delivered to the City an Energy Master Plan on October 12th, 2010. This Master Plan provided results of the energy audits, with recommended actions for decreasing both energy consumption and green house gas emissions. The City’s Department of Housing and Economic Development reviewed this plan, obtained cost projections, and prioritized activities that could be accomplished within available funds. On this basis, work on the selected projects was bid out. On April 18th, 2013, Trenton City Council resolved to award $375,249.00 to the selected contractor, upon the recommendations of the City Department of Housing and Economic Development. With the contract and funds approved, work was commenced. As of this writing [9/26/13], the following work has been completed: The hot water heater at the Samuel Naples Senior Center has been converted from electricity to natural gas; The 100 year old boiler located at the Trenton Library’s Main Branch has been replaced; New energy efficient condensers have been installed at the Reading Senior Center, renovating the split system; The inefficient boiler located at the Trenton Police Headquarters has been replaced; The RTU units located at the Police Headquarters have also been replaced.

  • Food Production

    Community or School Gardens

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Isles currently supports more than 60 community and school gardens across the city of Trenton by providing technical and organizational assistance to local residents and other community-based organizations. Municipal support is provided by The City of Trenton in the form of water access, including water service and permits to utilize fire hydrants for watering gardens. The City also provides woodchips, mulch, and allows drop-off of compostable materials from gardens for recycling. Isles also works with the City to help gardeners secure permission to garden on public property. We have a working relationship with the Trenton Board of Education, which allows us to develop gardens on school sites and conduct cooperative gardening and food education with teachers and students. We also work with other Green Team partners on school-wellness related work and utilize volunteers from community organizations. Over the years, these gardens have played a critical role at the household level in helping families meet their food needs by increasing access to fresh and nutritious foods at low cost. Gardens improve nutrition and health by providing exercise and fresh, and healthy fruits and vegetables. Gardening also strengthens the community by enhancing connections between people, making the streets more secure, and giving people a chance to share food with others. Isles works with teachers and students in gardens at over twenty schools in the Trenton area. Since 2013, we have proudly hosted FoodCorps service members in partnership with Rutgers Cooperative Extension and NJ Farm to School. Our staff worked directly with over 700 students in 2014, many of them repeatedly, at school gardens and at afterschool and summer programs. In addition to gardening education, we provide hands-on cooking workshops and lessons for both youth and families.

  • Support Local Food

    Farmers Markets

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Currently, the Trenton Downtown Association’s most visible service is our weekly farmer’s markets, Wednesdays on Warren Street and the Capital City Farmer’s Market that are held in the heart of downtown Trenton during the warmer months. As the name suggests, Wednesdays on Warren takes place every Wednesday during May and June, picking up with the Capital City Farmer’s Market every Thursday from July through October. Both markets run during lunch hours to attract local city workers and residents during the height of city activity. These markets offer fresh local produce, homemade crafts and jewelry from up to 18-25 local vendors. Additionally, there is often live music or entertainment that encourages people to come out of their offices and into our commercial district which helps support our regular downtown merchants. The City of Trenton is an essential partner in our weekly farmer’s markets that have taken place from early May to October for over 20 years. The city provides assistance by allowing the Capital City Market to take place in Mill Hill Park and Wednesdays on Warren to take place on municipal streets from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm on market days. Further, the Trenton Police Department provides security during these markets to promote an atmosphere that allows our merchants and entertainers to do business. The City of Trenton also allows our organization to promote our farmers markets on city property and in city offices including City Hall. Additionally, TDA sends a weekly email to advertise the markets and displays advertising materials with cooperating locations around Trenton (see attached). More information can be found on the TDA website: http://www.destinationtrenton.com/trenton-downtown-association/events-and-festivals/

    Making Farmers Markets Accessible

    5 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Trenton Downtown Association (TDA) is the non–profit 501(c)3 organization that runs the Special Improvement District in downtown Trenton, NJ. TDA’s principal responsibility is maintaining a clean and safe atmosphere in the downtown area that allows residents, workers, merchants, and visitors to engage in business and leisure activities downtown. TDA is also a destination marketing organization that receives funds from the Department of State, Division of Travel and Tourism to market the entire City of Trenton’s historical and cultural attractions. Currently, our most visible service is our weekly farmer’s markets, Wednesdays on Warren Street and the Capital City Farmer’s Market that are held in the heart of downtown Trenton during the spring and summer months. These markets offer fresh local produce and homemade crafts, jewelry, and products, to downtown workers and residents. Further there is usually live music and/or entertainment that encourages people to come out of their offices and into our commercial district which helps support our regular downtown merchants. The City of Trenton is an essential partner in our weekly farmer’s markets that have taken place from early May to October for the past several years. The city provides assistance by allowing the markets to take place on municipal streets that are blocked from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm on market days. The City of Trenton also provides the blockades and sanitation services that facilitate these operations. Further, the Trenton Police Department provides security and traffic control during these markets that provides for a safe and secure atmosphere that allows our merchants and entertainers to do business. The City of Trenton also allows our organization to promote our farmers markets on city property and in city offices including City Hall. The markets typically have 18 to 25 vendors providing an assortment of clothing, jewelry, snacks, baked goods, and social service information. The markets are highly accessible to public transportation, and are located within 1/4 mile of the Trenton Transit Center, the RiverLine Light Rail, and several NJ Transit bus stops. Asprocolas Acres is an Electronic Bit Transfer approved vendor who has participated in the Trenton Downtown Association’s Farmers Markets since 2009.

  • Green Design Commercial and Residential Buildings

    Create a Green Development Checklist

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Monifa Banks of Trenton's Department of Housing & Economic Development drafted a green building policy and checklist for the City of Trenton, which was adopted by the City Council in July, 2012. This policy and checklist were designed to ensure that all commercial and civic development is consistent with the City of Trenton's desire to create a more sustainable community, and that all development is consistent with the City's sustainable development goals. The policy and checklist were subsequently distributed to the planning and zoning boards.

  • Health & Wellness

    Building Healthier Communities

    20 Points

    Program Summary:

    The goal of the New Jersey Partnership for Healthy Kids-Trenton (NJPHK-T), a program of the YMCA of Trenton has been to reverse the trend of childhood obesity by 2015 though community wide efforts to improve access to affordable healthy food and beverages, and increase opportunities for physical activity. Trenton has successfully engaged local champions and other community stakeholders in childhood obesity prevention; Supported and facilitated the creation of policy and environmental conditions that support healthy eating and active living; and laid the groundwork for a culture of health. Our 2013-2014 accomplishments are attached (as well as a 2012 CHLI from Hedgepeth Williams School). Three of the 5 baseline measures that these accomplishments met were: school, neighborhood and community-at-large. One of the ways we have impacted the health and wellbeing of our community is through the passing of Trenton’s District Wellness Policy on January 20, 2015. See attached Policy. In addition, the Trenton Green Team has been an active partner in the Trenton Healthy Food Network's application to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's New Jersey Health Initiatives 2015 Culture of Health program. We were selected as finalists for grant funding and a site visit was held on April 1, 2015 (Agenda attached).

    Safe Routes to School

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The safety of students in getting to and from school is of major concern to parents, school administrators, and community officials, as well as to the students themselves. In addition, students’ physical activity and thus their health status can be affected by walking or biking to and from school, rather than riding in a car or bus. When thinking about school transportation, it is important to consider both safety concerns and the desirability of increased physical activity. School administrators at Grace Dunn Middle School in Trenton, NJ have recently been working on increasing the safety of routes to school for their students. With recent changes in the geographic district lines for the school, they wanted fuller and more accurate information about transportation modes the students are using for going to and from school, as well as students’ feelings of safety on these trips. The student survey reported here was a paper-and-pencil questionnaire administered in Dunn school homerooms in mid-January, 2014. It was conducted in the midst of a cold and snowy winter, which may have affected the responses about current transportation modes. All students were asked to complete the survey, consisting primarily of fixed choice questions. Students from 31 of the 42 homerooms returned the survey. See attached results. Several additional schools have participated in the Safe Routes to School program and several walk to school events have taken place. See the article link and the attached photos of these events: http://www.njhealthykids.org/trenton-students-learn-the-safe-routes-to-school/ AND http://www.saferoutesnj.org/part-two-walk-and-bike-to-school-month-in-new-jersey/ AND http://www.saferoutesnj.org/celebrate-new-jersey-walk-and-bike-to-school-month/ In addition, three travel plans were completed to foster Safe Routes to Schools (see attached): 1) Hedgepeth-Williams Middle School and Paul Robeson Elementary; 2) Monument Elementary; and 3) Woodrow Wilson Elementary. UPDATE: The Trenton Board of Education adopted a comprehensive district-wide Wellness Policy on January 20, 2015 (see upload). The Policy includes support for Safe Routes to School on page 9 of the policy, with supporting resources listed on page 28. See article link: http://www.saferoutesnj.org/trrenton-adopts-comprehensive-school-wellness-policy-including-safe-routes-to-school/ The Safe Routes to Schools team members have also been uploaded. The dates of the walking audits were as follows: Monument- June 8, 2013; Hedgepeth Williams/ Paul Robeson- June 8, 2013; and Wilson- June 12, 2013 (photos are uploaded).

    Smoke-Free and Tobacco-Free Public Places

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    UPDATE: The City of Trenton Department of Health has adopted an ordinance "to prohibit smoking in parks and recreation areas owned or otherwise possessed by the City of Trenton." See attached ordinance. The ordinance was approved by Trenton City Council at second reading on July 16, 2015. The ordinance was a collective effort on the part of the City of Trenton Department of Health, Trenton Green Team, New Jersey Prevention Network, Mercer Council on Alcoholism and Drug Addiction, and Hunterdon and Mercer County Regional Chronic Disease Coalition. Several of these partners testified in favor of the ordinance at the public meetings considering the ordinance. The ordinance specifies that the Trenton Department of Health and Human Services is responsible for enforcing the ordinance (the same department that spearheaded passage of the ordinance). No other Departments are involved in the enforcement process. All Departments were provided with a copy of the Ordinance and the Director of Health and Human Services has hosted a staff meeting to go over the enforcement policy, the procedures to be followed, and the education process for the public. These procedures will closely follow the enforcement strategies in place at the State Department of Health for the Smoke Free Air Act. As evident in the ordinance, signage is a requirement on all public property informing of the prohibition of smoking on the grounds. 108 signs were delivered in September 2015 (see attached image) and the New Jersey Prevention Network has ordered the Trenton ordinance stickers that will go at the bottom of the signs. Tobacco Free for a Health New Jersey has provided these signs to post on public property at no cost. There has been significant media coverage of this ordinance, including a supportive editorial in the Trenton Times and media stories in both the Trenton Times and Trentonian. Media coverage has been uploaded. Notice of the adoption of the ordinance also was posted on social media (see attached).

  • Innovation & Demonstration Projects

    Innovative Community Project 1

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Stormwater Resolution and Green Infrastructure Study After Superstorm Sandy, it has become apparent that storm and flood events cannot be treated as isolated incidents. Municipalities must assess their vulnerabilities and engage in planning and development of storm resilient infrastructure. In February 2015, the City of Trenton Planning Board adopted a resolution to amend the Master Plan to include Storm Protection Measures for the City of Trenton. The initiative was presented to the Planning Board for consideration by the Citizen’s Campaign. Understanding and accepting the realities of climate change and rising sea levels is the first step in planning for the future of Trenton. The adoption of a Storm Water Protection Amendment to the Master Plan comes at an opportune time, as the City is currently updating the Master Plan. The resolution offers guidance for next steps in identifying specific policies and tools which can be used at the local level in order to move toward storm resiliency and an economically viable future. The master plan contains several elements which are relevant to storm protection planning and such it is important to the Planning Board and Trenton residents that the plan articulates a clear policy concerning storm protection and stormwater management. This Master Plan Amendment is a foundational success in resiliency planning for Trenton. The resolution is attached below. In addition, and supplementing this resolution, NJFuture undertook a Green Infrastructure Study of downtown Trenton (attached below), proposing various ways for Trenton to more effectively manage its stormwater in sustainable ways. The numerous recommendations found in the study offer ways forward to implement the principles behind the Stormwater Resolution. In combination, this resolution and complementary study demonstrate Trenton's interest and commitment to addressing stormwater concerns sustainably, and to plan for Trenton's long-term future. Update: The Trenton Green Infrastructure Study was completed on November 18, 2014.

    Innovative Community Project 2

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The “Rx for Health” program, took place in the summer of 2014. The program was made possible through a collaboration with New Jersey Partnership for Healthy Kids-Trenton (NJPHK-T), America’s Grow-A-Row of Hunterdon County, the Henry J. Austin Health Center (HJAHC), Isles Inc. and Rutgers Cooperative Extension SNAP-ED program with funding provided by Sustainable NJ though the Trenton Green Team. Rx for Health supported and encouraged urban families to eat green, get active and start their family on the road to a healthier life by providing information and resources to sustain a healthy lifestyle and make the healthy choice the easy choice. The families were provided Jersey fresh produce, recipes and recipe tasting, nutrition information, urban garden tours and activity resources/ideas that could be practiced and sustained at home. It was innovative because it focused on families consisting of children with BMI in 95th+ percentile. Because it was coordinated with many partners, families were able to link their experience at the doctors office- to the prescriptions for fresh fruits and vegetables and physical activity. Then they had the opportunity to see where the produce came from, taste it and go home with recipes. The program was recognized for its innovation and presented at the NJ Land Conservation Rally in March 2015.

    Innovative Community Project 3

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Trenton Bike Repair Station: The Dero Fixit station and pump were purchased by the Greater Mercer Transportation Management Association (GMTMA) for installation at the Trenton Transit Center. NJ TRANSIT approved the location for its placement and agreed to do the installation. The installation took place in April 2015. This new Bike Repair Station is an important implementation element for the City of Trenton's Complete Streets Policy and represents an innovative and replicable practice. In terms of community outreach and education, the City of Trenton announced this new resource on its website: http://www.trentonnj.org/Cit-e-Access/news/index.cfm?NID=37487&TID=55&jump2=0 There was also media coverage of the unveiling of the bike station, which was attended by Mayor Jackson. See uploaded press release and media clips for more information.

    Raingardens

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    In 2013, a rain garden was installed as part of a larger community garden project on municipal property adjacent to The Crisis Ministry, a food pantry and social services organization in Trenton. Prior to development of the garden, the location was occupied by a vacant building which was destroyed by fire. The City of Trenton was instrumental in demolishing the remains of the building and in granting permission for a community garden to be developed. A local landscape designer offered their services pro-bono, and a 120 square foot rain garden was included in the design to capture roof runoff from the adjacent building. A grant of native plants was secured through the Mercer County Soil Conservation District and preparation and installation of the garden was done by volunteers. The project was completed through the partnership of multiple organizations, and education about the rain garden and water resources is targeted towards community members, clients of the food pantry, and children from the afterschool program from the YWCA across the street who participate in gardening activities at the site. Prior to the installation of the rain garden, Rutgers Water Resources offered a two-day workshop in Trenton hosted by Isles, Inc. on the design and installation of rain gardens, including the installation of a small rain garden on a nearby building rehabilitation project. Principles of rain garden design and plant selection are utilized regularly when developing community and school gardens. Rutgers Water Resources curriculum is also used during “Build a Rain Barrel” workshops offered by Isles to community members as a way to encourage water conservation. UPDATE: Outreach was conducted through the Isles Newsletter which is widely circulated to Trenton community residents: http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs175/1101674599623/archive/1114526544167.html#LETTER.BLOCK5 (also uploaded). Isles also promotes and advertises the rain garden through its virtual tour on its website: http://isles.org/services/urban-agriculture/map#.VfHI75fSPEY See the uploaded outreach documentation for additional outreach activities that were conducted.

  • Land Use & Transportation

    Bicycle and or Pedestrian Audit

    5 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, in partnership with the City of Trenton, conducted several bicycle and pedestrian audits in a variety of locations throughout the summer of 2014. The locations for the counts were selected with input from the City of Trenton Planning Division, members of Trenton Cycling Revolution and planners from Mercer County. The video and automatic bike counts were taken between May 4, 2014 and May 20, 2014. The pedestrian counts were taken between May 5, 2014 and June 3, 2015. This range of dates is due to several of the locations needing to be set more than once. Bicycle counts on Perry between Montgomery and Stockton had to be set many times and were finally captured July 22 – July 29. Westbound pedestrian counts on Broad from State to Hanover were captured July 22 – July 30. The full counts, and description of constraints and opportunities were incorporated into the Trenton Downtown Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, which is attached within a separate action for certification. Video from the audits were used during presentations to the community about the draft plan. Previously, in June and October of 2013, walking audits were conducted in North Trenton in consultation with the New Jersey Partnership for Healthy Kids-Trenton and the New Jersey Safe Routes to School program. More than 30 volunteers conducted a walking assessment to document the conditions of sidewalks and crosswalks around Monument Elementary School.

    Bicycle and or Pedestrian Plan

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Bike and Pedestrian Plan Narrative The City of Trenton partnered with the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission to complete a bicycle and pedestrian plan for downtown Trenton. The first stakeholder meeting was conducted on February 11, 2014 at Trenton City Hall. A follow-up meeting was conducted on September 3, 2014 at Trenton City Hall. At this meeting, planners from DVRPC presented draft recommendations for review and feedback. Trenton Cycling Revolution convened a larger community meeting for residents and members of the larger bike/pedestrian community on Monday, September 29, 2014. The draft recommendations were presented and additional feedback was provided to DVRPC planners. Additional feedback was provided by members of the community via email throughout October. On April 17, 2015 a final draft of the Downtown Trenton Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan was circulated with a deadline for all comments to be submitted by May 1, 2015. The draft plan includes a review of existing demographics, land use and transportation conditions; recommendations for on-street bicycle infrastructure, trails, intersections and other; and a guideline for implementation, including complementary policies, strategies and funding programs. DVRPC has an internal proofing process before final publication of the plan, hence the 'draft' label of the plan attached below. The draft plan was adopted by the Planning Board on June 25, 2015; the Planning Board agenda is attached below. On July 9, 2015, the Planning Board adopted a resolution memorializing the adoption of the plan (uploaded below).

    Complete Streets Program

    20 Points

    Program Summary:

    City Council unanimously enacted a Complete Streets resolution on March 1, 2012. On Wednesday, August 1, planning staff sent a memo to the planning and zoning board members to notify them of the policy. A separate memo detailing the policy has been drafted and will be distributed to all staff who are to attend the complete streets training. A complete streets training for appropriate staff has been scheduled for Thursday, October 12 and will be conducted by certified complete streets experts from the RBA Group. Further discussion and planning for institutionalizing the policy will take place at that training.

    Sustainable Land Use Pledge

    10 Points Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary:

    City Council passed a Sustainable Land Use Pledge resolution on Thursday, July 19. A memo was subsequently distributed to members of the planning board on July 27 and members of the zoning board on July 30.

    Transit-Oriented Development Supportive Zoning

    20 Points

    Program Summary:

    Trenton Transit Center serves nearly 5000 people daily, with connecting service between Amtrak, NJ Transit rail, light rail, and bus service, and SEPTA rail and bus service. It is the third busiest rail station in New Jersey (after Newark and Secaucus Junction). A Redevelopment Plan has been in place since 1984, with amendment and revisions most recently in 2008, for the area surrounding the transit center. The plan was adopted by Trenton City Council in 2008. The Redevelopment Plan meets all the requirements for Sustainable Jersey expectations of TOD-Supportive Zoning. See the attached Redevelopment Plan for details.

  • Local Economies

    Green Jobs/Economic Development

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The challenges of energy efficiency and environmental cleanup create a real opportunity in urban communities. The combination of high underemployment in cities and the growing need to create new green jobs provides a chance to train urban residents for those jobs, which pay well and allow residents to improve their own communities. Isles’ Center for Energy & Environmental Training (CEET) provides professional training in energy and environmental fields for: • Unemployed and underemployed individuals seeking green jobs; • Workers wishing to advance their skills and certifications; • Employers seeking customized training for their employees. Isles’ CEET offers industry-driven training that includes classroom, laboratory and field experiences. CEET features duct, heating, air sealing, and insulation labs as well as life-sized mock ups and a model house of pressure. As a Building Performance Institute (BPI) Testing Center, CEET offers a number of training and testing opportunities in the home performance field. CEET also serves as New Jersey’s training center for the National Center for Healthy Housing, providing training for workers as well as community members. In addition, CEET offers training for current workers and others in areas such as OSHA 10, ASHRAE 62.2, Lead Paint Renovation and Repair, and Lead Dust Sampling. Further extending its efforts to foster self-reliance, Isles, with start-up support from the NJ State Department of Labor and Workforce Development, created the Center for Energy and Environmental Training to better meet the current and future demand for training in clean energy, weatherization, healthy homes, and environmental fields. CEET is now a Building Performance Institute (BPI) approved testing center and is the New Jersey training affiliate for the National Center for Healthy Housing. To date, CEET has provided training for approximately 1,300 individuals, including job training for unemployed individuals as well as additional training for existing workers in the energy efficiency, renewable energy, healthy homes, or related construction fields.

  • Buy Local Programs

    Support Local Businesses

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Trenton Downtown Association (TDA) is the non–profit 501(c) 3 organization that runs the Special Improvement District in downtown Trenton, NJ. TDA’s mission is to make New Jersey’s capital city a more attractive location for investors and business owners, and a more engaging center for workers, residents and visitors. Since 1986, TDA has striven to meet this mission by nurturing and promoting downtown business development, arts, culture and tourism programs and public space initiatives. TDA is also a destination marketing organization that receives funds from the Department of State, Division of Travel and Tourism to market the entire City of Trenton’s historical and cultural attractions. All of the services TDA provides serve to revitalize the economy by supporting local businesses. Services include: Business ombudsman services Financing information and guidance Referrals for prospective office and retail tenants Merchant parking garage voucher program and reduced monthly parking for small business owners. Biweekly email newsletter exclusively for business and property owners Public relations services, including writing and distribution of press releases and event planning assistance Promotions support via online marketing TDA and Destination Trenton websites, Facebook and email marketing (see links below) http://www.destinationtrenton.com/trenton-downtown-association/ https://www.facebook.com/pages/Trenton-Downtown-Association/27429311931 Event planning to encourage residents and city workers to visit our commercial district, which helps support our regular downtown merchants. Such events include our weekly farmer’s markets http://www.destinationtrenton.com/trenton-downtown-association/events-and-festivals/ TDA recently received a $25,000 grant from the Mortimer and Mimi Levitt Foundation for Trenton to be one of 10 cities in America to hold a LevittAmp Concert Series. This event begins Saturday, July 25th and continues through September 26th. TDA will encourage local businesses and vendors to participate in this event http://concerts.levittamp.org/trenton TDA provides a Façade Improvement Grant Program which offers up to $2,500 in grants for a property owner making improvements to his/her façade. This program is designed to encourage investment, historic preservation, and beautification of local businesses. http://www.destinationtrenton.com/trenton-downtown-association/business-services/facade-program/ Trenton Visitor’s Center and Destination Trenton Train Station Kiosk. Managed by TDA, these tourism offices are staffed and stocked with information on local business, attractions, and events to encourage all visitors to the Trenton area to explore what downtown Trenton businesses have to offer. Representatives of TDA serve on the Trenton Green Team and coordinate efforts between the two organizations.

  • Natural Resources

    Natural Resource Inventory

    20 Points Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary:

    In February 2015, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) published the City of Trenton Natural Resource Inventory (NRI). The NRI was funded through the Environmental work program of DVRPC. DVRPC worked closely with The City of Trenton Division of Planning and Green Team for contributions to the document. The purpose of the NRI is to identify and describe the natural resources of Trenton, as these resources are fundamental to the City’s character. The completion of the NRI occurred at an opportune time for Trenton. The City is presently updating the Master Plan, known as Trenton250. The NRI provides a basis for the development of methods and steps to preserve, conserve, and utilize those resources. The City plans to use the information provided in the NRI as the baseline data informing the update of the Land Use and Circulation, Environment, Health and Food Systems, Economic Development, Housing and Education elements of the Trenton250 Master Plan. The Planning Board approved a resolution incorporating the NRI into the City's Master Plan at its meeting on May 28, 2015. Update: The Planning Board adopted a resolution memorializing adoption of the NRI at its meeting on June 11, 2015 (see uploaded resolution). Updated NRI Review Policy: The NRI has been adopted as part of the Master Plan, therefore the City of Trenton is required to review and update it every ten years as per Municipal Land Use Law requirements. The City and the Green Team is actively seeking to create an Environmental Commission in Trenton which typically updates the NRI. Until the Commission is created, the City of Trenton Division of Planning staff will be the responsible entity for periodically reviewing the NRI to ensure it is still up-to-date. It is anticipated that this will occur at least once every five years. Furthermore, the City is presently updating our master plan, which may propose a shorter time period for review of the document. The new master plan, entitled Trenton250, is scheduled for completion by the end of 2016.

  • Sustainability Planning

    Climate Action Plan

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    TRENTON CLIMATE ACTION PLAN The Trenton Climate Action was prepared for the City by the NJ Sustainable State Institute of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Policy and Planning, in 2010. The Development of the Climate Action Plan was funded by means of an Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant awarded to the City of Trenton the previous year. The Climate Action Plan provides both a municipal government carbon foot print, and a community wide carbon footprint. As well as establishing goals for decreasing green house emissions within the City of Trenton, the Plan provides 39 recommendations to accomplish this. These recommendations also provide actions the City might contemplate taking to both decrease operating costs and make the City a more sustainable community in general. With the posting of Trenton’s Climate Action Plan on the City website, this plan has guided both the City’s Department of Housing and Economic Development and the City’s Green Team in their efforts during the intervening time period. For example, in March of 2012, the City implemented a Complete Streets orientation when the City Council approved such an approach by Resolution. The City also established a Sustainable Land Use orientation when the City Council pledged, by Resolution, in July of 2012, to do so. At that time the Department of Housing and Economic Development operationalized this approach by issuing a new Green Policy Check List by which to evaluate all future development proposals. During the early Spring of 2013, the Trenton City Planning Board recognized the importance of this Planning Document [the CAP], and recommended that City Council provide its formal approval to the Document to both memorialize its importance, and to affirm that the City is committed to its guidance. On August 15th, 2013, the Trenton City Council re-examined the CAP and affirmed its recommendations and principles by Resolution.

    Community Asset Mapping

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Trenton Green Team assembled a comprehensive look at the City's assets in our interactive map, including historical sites, art installations and murals, civic groups, parks, churches, nonprofits & businesses working towards sustainability, polling places, etc. The map is visible online: http://www.mappler.net/trentonassetmap/ Our intent is to make this community asset map a practical resource for viewers, rather than a simple listing of Trenton's positive attributes, which is why the map provides additional details of the sites beyond their locations. Also included are pertinent contact information, meeting dates/locations/times, etc. so that viewers can use the map as a practical resource. The purpose of the community asset map is to educate not only Trenton residents about all of the wonderful efforts happening in the City, but also to create a more sustainable community at-large - motivating people outside of the City to see Trenton as a positive place to do business, live and play.

    Community Carbon Footprint

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The Trenton Climate Action Plan was completed by the Spiezle Group in 2009, based on 2008 data. Part of that process was to establish a baseline carbon footprint for both the municipality and the community at large. Both measurements are included in the attached pdf.

    Community Visioning

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The development of the Trenton250 Vision Element was an ambitious outreach effort designed to create consensus around a community-driven vision. The vision statement and guiding principles sets the direction for the City and will guide the creation of all future master plan elements as well as city policies, programs, and projects. The Vision Element was adopted by the Planning Board on October 09, 2014. The Planning Division completed the following actions: • Conducted a 200 person Youth Summit at a local high school where more than 20 visions were submitted and five students were nominated to join the Master Plan Steering Committee. • Designed a custom, mobile-phone-compatible, multilingual website that hosted multiple quick, low-investment opportunities to participate. The website attracted over 2,000 unique visitors and was complemented by an aggressive social media campaign on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. That effort produced over 1,000 Facebook friends and more than 50 visions submitted via a Twitter hashtag. • Conducted a public meeting in every ward of the City and conducted several stakeholder meetings with businesses, nonprofits, educational and artistic institutions. • Ensured that all outreach efforts, such as the website, as posters, flyers, and brochures were available in both English and Spanish. Most importantly, Trenton250 teamed with a local non-profit, El Centro, to host a Spanish-speaking public meeting. Trenton will directly benefit from the Vision Element. There is now a documented consensus around a community-driven Vision Statement and a set of Guiding Principles that expresses what the community wants Trenton to be in 2042. More importantly, residents and stakeholders now have a clear easy-to understand tool for evaluating whether proposed policies, plans, and projects align with the community’s long-term vision for the City. This will be particularly important as the City and its residents embark on efforts to complete the rest of the master plan elements.

    Municipal Carbon Footprint

    10 Points Bronze Priority Silver Priority

    Program Summary:

    The Trenton Climate Action Plan was completed by the Spiezle Group in 2009, based on 2008 data. Part of that process was to establish a baseline carbon footprint for both the municipality and the community at large. Both measurements are included in the attached pdf.